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ROTARACT HANDBOOK

ROTARACT HANDBOOK
Rotaract has evolved quickly in its short but dynamic history. In the early 1960s,
Rotary clubs around the world began to sponsor university youth groups as Community
Service projects. The 1967-68 Rotary International (RI) President, Luther Hodges, and the
RI Board of Directors considered this club activity to have international relevance, and
Rotaract was approved in 1968 as an official program for Rotary clubs. The first club
chartered was the Rotaract Club of North Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S.A. on
13 March 1968.
Several decades later, the Rotaract program has grown into a strong international network
of clubs in over 170 countries and geographical areas, with more than 145,000 members in
over 6,400 clubs — clubs organized for young men and women (ages 18 to 30) to serve the
physical and social needs of their communities, widen their friendships and professional
contacts, and increase their understanding of the world.
Rotarians, Rotaractors and young adults who are considering becoming Rotaractors can
all use and benefit from the information found in the pages of this book.
The purpose of this handbook is:
● To inform Rotarians on how to organize a Rotaract club.
● To give Rotarians and Rotaractors information on the administration of a Rotaract club.
● To explain how Rotaract fits into the Rotary structure.
● To show how Rotaract operates at the district level.
● To provide an overview of Rotaract activities.
● To provide information about Rotary International resources available to both
Rotarians and Rotaractors.Table of Contents
Preface
1 Introduction to Rotaract 1
Rotaract: A Key Member of the Rotary Family
Activities Undertaken by Rotaract Clubs
Why Organize a Rotaract Club?
2 Organizing a Rotaract Club 3
Getting Started
Identifying the Membership Base for a Rotaract Club
Informational Meeting
Organizational Meetings
Chartering the Rotaract Club
3 Club Administration and Program 7
Structure
Roles and Responsibilities of Club Officers
Rotaract Club Committees
Meeting Programs
4 The District Structure and Beyond 11
Roles of the District Governor, District Chairperson
and District Rotaract Representative
Rotaract District Committee
District Meetings
Multidistrict Activities, Meetings and Organizations
Regional and International Meetings
5 Rotaract and Rotary International 17
Program Policies
Program Administration
Services
Special Events
6 Resources 21
Resources of Rotary International
Resources of The Rotary Foundation
Other Resources
7 Rotaract in Action 27
8 Administrative Forms and
Constitutional Documents 31Rotaract Handbook 1
1
Introduction
to Rotaract
Rotaract clubs are part of a global effort
to bring peace and international understanding to the world. This effort starts at
the community level but knows no limits in
its outreach. Rotaractors have access to the
many resources of Rotary International and
The Rotary Foundation. Rotary International provides the administrative support
that helps Rotaract clubs thrive.
Rotaract: A Key Member
of the Rotary Family
Rotary International is a worldwide service
organization for leading business and
professional men and women with 29,000
Rotary clubs and over 1.2 million members.
Each Rotaract club is sponsored by a local
Rotary club. This sponsorship is a result of
Rotary’s concern that young people, or
“New Generations,” should take an active
interest in community life and have the
opportunity for professional development.
Rotaract provides a vehicle through which
New Generations can find that involvement.
Organizing a Rotaract club is one of the
most rewarding activities a Rotary club can
undertake in its community. The Rotaract
program gives Rotarians the opportunity to
mentor dynamic young men and women
interested in providing service to their own
communities and the global community.
Rotarians also serve as resources for
Rotaractors who are in the process of
becoming professionals and community
leaders. In turn, a Rotaract club can bring
new energy to a Rotary club, inspire fresh
ideas for service, increase support to
projects, and help develop future Rotary
club members.
Rotaract clubs are self-governed and largely
self-financed at the local level. Working in
cooperation with their sponsoring Rotary
clubs as partners-in-service, Rotaractors are
an important part of Rotary’s extended
family.
The Standard Rotaract Club Constitution
defines the role of the Rotary club sponsor
in Articles III, V and XIII.
Activities Undertaken
by Rotaract Clubs
You might ask, “What exactly does a
Rotaract club do?” Rotaract clubs organize
a variety of projects and activities, depending
primarily on the interests of the club
members. There are, however, three types
of activities within the Rotaract program
that all clubs undertake in varying degrees:
professional development, leadership
development, and service projects. Together,
these three areas ensure a balanced club
program and provide important experience
and opportunities for the personal development of each Rotaractor.
Professional Development
A club’s professional development activities
should expand the members’ understanding
of the work environment and business
opportunities within their community.
These activities should highlight the
Rotaractor’s role in the community’s
economic development and illustrate how2 Rotaract Handbook
skills developed through service activities
can help in resolving problems in the workplace. Each Rotaract club should provide
professional development opportunities to
its members through activities such as:
● special professional and vocational
forums
● business technology updates
● management and marketing seminars
● conferences on business and
professional ethics
● presentations on finance and credit
options for business start-up
Sponsoring Rotarians can enhance the
professional development of Rotaractors by
providing practical advice on entering the
business world and overcoming business,
vocational, and professional challenges.
Making the club’s professional development
projects joint Rotaract-Rotary projects can
also help Rotaractors get better acquainted
with sponsoring Rotarians.
Leadership Development
A club’s leadership development activities
not only aim to make members more
effective leaders in their personal lives,
but also teach them how to develop and
sustain strong clubs with relevant projects.
Important topics to address in training club
leaders include:
● improving public speaking skills
● techniques for marketing the Rotaract
program to potential members
● building consensus among members
● delegating project responsibilities and
ensuring the necessary follow-up
● identifying channels for project publicity
and promotion
● finding financial resources for
strengthening club development
● assessing project success
Service Projects
Above all other principles, “Service
Above Self” is the credo that guides Rotary.
A Rotaract club’s service projects are
designed to improve the quality of life at
home and abroad. These projects often
address today’s most critical issues, such as
violence, drug abuse, AIDS, hunger, the
environment and illiteracy. Each Rotaract
club is required to complete at least two
major service projects annually, one to
serve the community and the other to
promote international understanding.
Each should involve all or most of the
members of the club.
Article VII of the Standard Rotaract Club
Constitution outlines Rotaract club activity
and project guidelines.
Why Organize
a Rotaract Club?
Today’s young people will become
tomorrow’s parents, professionals, business
leaders and community leaders. With the
help of programs like Rotaract, they can
gain the tools and skills necessary to
develop into responsible, productive
members of society. Now is the time for
Rotary clubs to focus on the future by
challenging the New Generations to test
their talents, develop new skills, and
confront issues they will face in their
lifetime. The Rotaract program can instill
in its members life skills that can be shared
with others for generations to come.Rotaract Handbook 3
2
Organizing
a Rotaract
Club
university administration, explaining the
purpose and goals of both Rotary and
Rotaract. It is important to stress that it is
Rotary’s intention to comply with school
regulations regarding student organizations.
If it is determined by university administrators and the Rotaract club organizers
that a university-based club would be
mutually beneficial, then the Rotaract club
organizers should find a member of the
faculty to serve as an advisor to the club.
The faculty advisor must be willing to
work closely with the students in a nonclassroom setting and should be generally
well-liked by students. The faculty advisor
should also work with an advisor from the
sponsoring Rotary club and the Rotaract
club organizers to develop a recruitment
strategy to attract members to the new club.
Although community-based clubs offer
greater flexibility and autonomy than
university-based clubs, both approaches to
Rotaract club organization have proven
successful in various parts of the world.
At this point, the organizers need to review
the Rotaract Club Organization List and the
Rotaract Membership Application which can
be found in the “Administrative Forms and
Constitutional Documents” section of this
handbook.
The sections below include detailed strategies
for recruiting potential Rotaract club
members and the steps that must be taken
by them to become officially recognized by
RI. Rotarians would be wise to work with
current or past Rotaractors during this
Rotary clubs should fully understand the
Rotaract program before starting a new
Rotaract club. This handbook is just one of
many resources available to learn about
Rotaract. Potential Rotaract club sponsors
should talk with other Rotarians and
Rotaractors who are already involved in
Rotaract to get a firsthand impression of
the program. Rotaract, like Rotary, is
diverse, and each club takes on its own
unique qualities, depending on where in
the world it is established.
Getting Started
Once you have a feel for the program and
the types of young people who would be
attracted to a Rotaract club, you are ready
to plan your strategy for starting a new
club. There are two types of Rotaract clubs
to consider: community-based clubs and
university-based clubs. In communitybased clubs, all members of the community
ages 18-30 are potential candidates for
membership. Organizing a communitybased Rotaract club is challenging and
takes perseverance. A Rotarian from the
sponsoring Rotary club should be appointed to serve as the primary advisor for
the newly forming Rotaract club once the
organizers have decided that a communitybased club is what they prefer.
University-based clubs also consist of
members from ages 18-30, but they must be
enrolled in university courses (Rotaract
clubs established at colleges would be
considered university-based). Those who
wish to organize a university-based
Rotaract club should work closely with the4 Rotaract Handbook
imagination to develop as wide a membership pool as possible.
Refer to Article IV of the Standard Rotaract
Club Constitution for more details regarding
membership qualifications for Rotaract.
Informational Meeting
Once you have identified the membership
base, your Rotary club is ready to convene
an informational meeting for them. The
informational meeting helps Rotaract club
organizers learn about the interests of
prospective members and gives organizers
a chance to explain how a Rotaract club can
help develop these interests. Here are some
ideas for an informal meeting that you may
wish to consider:
● Invite a Rotarian from the sponsoring
Rotary club to provide welcoming
remarks and a brief explanation of
Rotary.
● Invite a Rotaractor (District Rotaract
Representative or Rotaract club officer)
to explain Rotaract’s purpose, goals, and
activities, as well as member attendance
and participation requirements.
● Ask those interested in becoming
members to fill out the “Rotaract
Membership Application” form
(page 49).
Organizational Meetings
Once prospective Rotaractors have demonstrated interest, you can begin working
with them to organize and plan activities.
To maintain a high level of enthusiasm in
your core membership pool, you may want
to space organizational meetings no more
than two weeks apart. Be sure to keep a
record of the names, addresses, telephone
numbers and e-mail addresses of those who
attend so that you can continue to invite
them to future meetings. Always encourage
them to invite their friends as well to
expand your charter membership base.
There are no requirements for the number
of meetings to be held prior to a Rotaract
club’s official certification. Each club’s
development is unique. However, the
following are areas that you will need to
address during the organizational phase:
time, as they can provide valuable insight
into the process.
Established Rotaract clubs may want to
start new Rotaract clubs as part of an
extension program. Rotaractors should
contact their sponsoring club or identify a
different Rotary club sponsor and also
follow the steps described in this chapter.
Joint Sponsorship of
a Rotaract Club
A Rotaract club can be organized and sponsored jointly by more than one Rotary club
under the following conditions:
● the District Governor gives his or her
approval in writing
● the circumstances must be such that the
organization of separate Rotaract clubs,
each sponsored by a single Rotary club,
would create an artificial division of what is
essentially a single body of young adults
within the community or university
● a joint Rotaract committee is created with
representation from each of the sponsoring
Rotary clubs
● each member of the Rotaract club agrees to
adhere to the provisions of the constitution
and bylaws of the club
Identifying the Membership
Base for a Rotaract Club
When you have determined the type of
Rotaract club to start, it’s time to develop
a recruitment strategy. To identify eligible
young professionals, you may wish to start
with the sons, daughters and other family
members of Rotarians in the area. Rotarians
may have young employees or interns that
may benefit from joining a Rotaract club.
Also keep in mind that Youth Exchange
students, Interact alumni, returned Ambassadorial Scholars, Group Study Exchange
alumni and RYLA participants may be
excellent Rotaract candidates. Finally,
community centers, churches, health clubs,
universities and continuing education
programs are just a few community sources
for potential club members. Use yourRotaract Handbook 5
● Identify potential club leaders and hold
elections for president, vice-president,
secretary, treasurer, and members of the
board of directors. Provide them with
the “Roles and Responsibilities of Club
Officers” found in Chapter 3.
● Discuss and establish annual club dues.
These generally range from US$5 to
US$100, depending on the activities
planned by the club.
● Determine meeting place and time.
Clubs are required to meet at least twice
a month.
Chartering the
Rotaract Club
When a prospective Rotaract club has
achieved a strong base of members, it
should be ready to proceed with applying
for official RI certification. It is recommended that there be a minimum of 15
charter members. In accordance with the
Rotaract Statement of Policy, the prospective
club should first adopt the Standard Rotaract
Club Constitution and all its amendments.
It should also adopt by-laws consistent
with the Standard Rotaract Club Constitution
and policy established by Rotary International. These by-laws are subject to the
approval of the sponsoring Rotary club.
The Rotaract Club Organization List should
then be filled out listing all charter members
who have committed to attending a minimum of 60 percent of the club’s service and
social activities. The Organization List must
then be signed by the sponsoring Rotary
club president and the District Governor
and sent with US$50 to RI World Headquarters or the RI Service Center serving
the area for club certification. In some cases,
payment may be made in local currency
via an RI fiscal agent. Please consult the
RI Official Directory for a list of authorized
fiscal agents.
Upon certification of the Rotaract club,
the sponsoring Rotary club will receive a
handsome certificate that can be presented
to the newly-formed Rotaract club. Followup materials are also sent, including the
Worldwide Rotaract Directory and information
about RI resources available to assist with
club service projects.
Inaugural Ceremony
The inaugural ceremony marks the official
certification of the Rotaract club by Rotary
International, which is an exciting moment
in the Rotaract club’s organization. The
“Rotaract Certification of Organization” is
sent to the president of the sponsoring Rotary
club approximately four weeks after the RI
Secretariat receives the Organization List.
The Rotary club sponsor(s) may wish to
plan and host the inaugural ceremony
welcoming new Rotaractors as partners in
Rotary service. Each ceremony is unique
and has no set format. You might wish to
invite district leaders such as the District
Governor, District Rotaract Chairperson
and District Rotaract Representative to this
celebration to help establish the presence of
the new Rotaract club in the district.
Installation Ceremony
Another special moment for your new
Rotaract club will be the installation of club
officers. An officer installation can be a
ceremonious occasion or a gala at which the
new club officers are officially recognized
as the club’s leadership for the year. An
installation ceremony is then held annually
to thank the past officers for their year of
dedicated work and greet new officers for
the year to come.
The incoming president and officers of the
sponsoring Rotary club should be invited
to this event so they can get acquainted
with the new Rotaract club officers. This
can increase communication between
Rotaract and Rotary clubs and strengthen
joint projects and activities.Rotaract Handbook 7
3
Club
Administration
and Program
to develop a working relationship. The
board and the incoming president should
review new club activities and discuss
successful past activities. The president’s
ability to work effectively with the Rotaract
board of directors ultimately measures how
well he or she leads the entire club.
Much like the board of directors for a
business, the Rotaract board of directors
ensures that the club will not undertake
activities that will risk its financial solvency.
It ensures that administrative responsibility,
member recruitment and fundraising are
balanced with program activities to keep
the club active and strong.
Roles and Responsibilities
of Club Officers
The Office of President
As the club leader, the president helps
members to develop as leaders and works
to ensure that the club’s professional and
leadership development activities and
community and international service
projects are successfully promoted and
completed. The president identifies member skills and interests and puts them to
work in club projects.
The president is responsible for maintaining
club operations, delegating responsibilities,
and establishing meeting schedules. The
president should develop a plan for the
year as early as possible. The “Summary of
Rotaract Plans and Objectives” on page 45
provides guidelines for developing the
year’s plan. The president presides over all
With your new Rotaract club chartered, the
organizers take on the role of advisors as
the club develops its governing structure
and program. In order to maintain a viable
and healthy Rotaract club, the development
of strong leadership and a committed,
interested membership is vital.
Structure
Under the leadership of the Rotaract club
president, the members of a Rotaract club
plan professional development activities,
leadership training, community and
international service projects, fundraisers,
and social events. It is the role of the club’s
board of directors to review and approve
these plans.
A Rotaract club’s board of directors
consists of the following elected officers:
president, immediate past president,
vice-president, secretary, treasurer, three
directors, and additional officers deemed
necessary by the president and the club.
The board is the governing body for the
club and meets at least once a month. Club
members in good standing may attend
board meetings as observers.
As a procedural matter, most of the club
business should be transacted during board
meetings rather than club meetings. The
board must report to the membership on all
actions taken and policies approved during
its meetings. Every board report should be
discussed by the membership at the earliest
opportunity.
The incoming president should meet with
the board of directors prior to taking office8 Rotaract Handbook
meetings of the club and its board of
directors; following parliamentary procedure may help to keep discussion relevant.
The president should also maintain regular
communication with the sponsoring Rotary
club (through joint activities and meetings),
the District Rotaract Representative (through
club participation in district activities and
meetings) and Rotary International (through
participation in the Rotaract Pre-Convention
Meeting and annual reporting). To help
facilitate communication, a bulletin or
newsletter featuring the outstanding
Rotaract club projects or activities should
be distributed to the Rotary club sponsor(s),
the District Rotaract Representative, and
Rotary International. With board approval,
the president appoints all standing and
special committees and follows up on
committee progress with the help of the
vice-president.
The Office of Vice-President
The club vice-president, a key Rotaract
officer, can serve more effectively by
understanding the year’s goals, projects
and activities, and being well-versed in
community and Rotary resources. To that
end, it is important that the club president
and vice-president work together as a team.
This can be particularly helpful for clubs that
elect to have the incoming president serve
as vice-president prior to taking office.
The vice-president presides at all meetings
when the president is absent. The vicepresident also serves on the board of
directors and as an ex-officio member of all
committees. Additionally, the vice-president
acts as the “officer-at-large,” responsible for
all assignments that are designated by the
president.
A well-organized and responsible vicepresident is often the key to a successful
Rotaract year. The vice-president can
reduce the administrative load, allowing
the president time to develop new and
exciting club projects and activities.
The Office of Secretary
The Rotaract club secretary has many
responsibilities that require a person who
is detail-oriented and organized. Often,
Rotaract clubs will appoint a second
secretary to be trained and to provide
assistance. Because the secretary promotes
the club through correspondence to the
Rotary club sponsor(s), outside agencies,
prospective members, Rotary International,
and other Rotaract clubs, this individual
must have good communication skills.
The secretary handles the club’s communication with the public, maintains all club
records, and takes the minutes for all board
and club meetings. Once members reach
the age limit of 30, the secretary sends the
“Notice of Rotaract Alumnus (Potential
Rotarian)” form (page 50) to the secretary
of the sponsoring Rotary club.
The Office of Treasurer
As the collector and disburser of club
funds, the treasurer is responsible for the
club’s solvency and financial stability. The
treasurer chairs the finance committee,
works with the board of directors to
develop the budget, collects dues and all
funds raised by the club and pays all club
bills and reimbursements for club expenses.
The treasurer reports the club’s financial
status at each meeting and has the books
audited at the end of the fiscal year. In
preparing for this assignment, the treasurer
should meet with the previous treasurer
and consult the sponsoring Rotary club
treasurer and a certified accountant.
Recording and managing the club funds is
an important responsibility that requires
continual review. Often, Rotaract clubs will
appoint a second treasurer to train and
assist. This guarantees continuity and
ensures a trained substitute treasurer.
All incoming Rotaract club officers should
be provided with Rotaract club officer
leadership training at the district level,
which includes a one- to two-day leadership training seminar conducted by the
Rotaract district committee in coordination
with the RI district.Rotaract Handbook 9
Articles V, VI, VIII and IX of the Standard
Rotaract Club Constitution provide a more
detailed overview of the Rotaract club
structure.
Rotaract Club Committees
Club committees are vital in effectively
carrying out the activities of the Rotaract
club. The club president appoints five
standing committees, with the approval of
the board of directors, as prescribed by the
Standard Rotaract Club Constitution. These
include the Club Service, Community
Service, International Service, Professional
Development and Finance Committees.
Additional special committees may be
appointed as needed.
Committees should meet at least once a
month to discuss plans and activities for
report to the president. All committee
activities and expenses are subject to board
approval.
Club Service Committee: This committee
plans strategies for membership development and retention, takes meeting minutes,
writes and distributes the club bulletin
and plans fellowship activities for the
membership.
Community Service Committee: This
committee reviews suggestions and develops
plans for the club’s annual community
service project(s) and takes a leadership
role organizing and facilitating the project(s).
International Service Committee: This
committee reviews suggestions and develops
plans for the club’s annual international
service project(s) and takes a leadership
role in organizing and facilitating the
project(s). In addition, this committee
develops other activities that promote
international understanding among club
members and in the community.
Professional Development Committee:
This committee reviews suggestions and
develops plans to provide opportunities for
professional development for the club’s
membership and takes a leadership role in
facilitating programs and projects related to
this area.
Finance Committee: This committee is
responsible for any district and club dues
collection as well as planning for club
fundraising to support club administration
and service activities. The treasurer acts as
the committee chairperson.
Meeting Programs
Programs may draw on experts from the
community or university, outstanding
business leaders or international guests,
or feature field trips to historical sites,
businesses, and factories. Some meetings
may be designated for updates on Rotary
programs or Rotaract club projects. To keep
meetings interesting and lively, you may
want to make the program varied in format
(e.g., speakers, panel discussions, debates,
videos, slides, entertainment, and trips).
Although the president should review all
program content, he or she will probably
want to appoint a meeting chairperson to
organize the year’s programs or ask different
members to organize one meeting program
each year. If numerous Rotaractors are
involved in planning meeting programs
during the year, you will likely produce
fresh and original programs. Remember,
the sponsoring Rotary club can be an
excellent source for interesting programs.10 Rotaract Handbook
Spread the Word
Rotaract clubs may wish to produce a bulletin or newsletter to inform club members
of upcoming activities or share reports about past events. This type of information
should also be shared with the sponsoring Rotary club(s) and key community
members who support Rotaract. Clubs should also provide a copy to the District
Governor, District Rotaract Representative and Rotary International to keep them
updated on club activities.
Projects are more likely to receive support if the public knows of the Rotary movement and its achievements. By sharing your club’s accomplishments, you contribute
to an accurate, positive image of Rotary in your community. Of equal importance is
creating awareness of your Rotaract club in the community as a means of attracting
potential new members.
Public relations should be directed to several audiences including local government
officials, the business community and other civic leaders and organizations, and
people directly affected by Rotaract service projects.
Public relations campaigns don’t happen by chance; they require time, effort and
planning. Effective Public Relations: A Guide for Rotary Clubs (257-EN) is an excellent
resource for Rotaractors to use in a variety of situations, whether you are writing a
press release in order to recruit new members or seeking community support for a
service project.Rotaract Handbook 11
* A Rotaractor must complete one year as Rotaract club president or as a member of the Rotaract District
Committee before serving as District Rotaract Representative.
4
The District
Structure
and Beyond
clubs in the district, increase communication
among Rotaract clubs, and plan districtwide training for Rotaract club officers.
The District Rotaract Chairperson
The District Rotaract Chairperson is a
Rotarian appointed by the District Governor
who assists him or her in publicizing the
Rotaract program, promoting the organization of new Rotaract clubs, and administering
the Rotaract program within the district.
The chairperson also provides the leadership necessary for the members of the
District Rotaract Committee to carry out
these objectives.
The District Rotaract Chairperson can
develop the Rotaract program through an
active Rotaract publicity and promotion
campaign. The chairperson should also be
a knowledgeable, accessible Rotaract
resource person for both Rotary and
Rotaract clubs and should take the lead in
providing training for the District Rotaract
Representative.
The District Rotaract
Representative
The District Rotaract Representative is a
Rotaractor elected by the Rotaract clubs in
the district by secret ballot.* In districts
where there is only one Rotaract club, the
Rotaract activities at the district level provide
opportunities for joint projects between
Rotaract clubs, training of new club officers,
sharing ideas for strengthening club service,
and promoting Rotaract extension to new
areas. Rotaractors involved in these activities
inevitably get to know Rotaract better. For
Rotary districts with only one Rotaract club,
Rotaract district activities focus on developing a mechanism for Rotaract club
extension to new communities in the
district. The more you promote Rotaract
in neighboring communities, the more
Rotaract grows in your own community.
Roles of the District
Governor, District
Chairperson and District
Rotaract Representative
The District Governor
Each of the more than 500 Rotary districts
worldwide is led by a District Governor, an
elected Rotarian who serves as an officer of
RI and represents the RI Board of Directors
in the field. The District Governor is
concerned with the organization and
development of Rotaract clubs and appoints a District Rotaract Chairperson and
the District Rotaract Committee (comprised
of Rotarians) to address this issue. This
committee works to organize new Rotaract12 Rotaract Handbook
District Rotaract Representative is the most
recent, available past Rotaract club president,
or current president if the club is recently
organized.
The District Rotaract Representative serves
as a liaison between the Rotaract clubs and
the District Rotaract Committee (comprised
of Rotarians) and Rotary International. In
order to effectively carry out this function,
the District Rotaract Representative must
develop a strong communication network
among clubs. This same network can be used
to relay information both from the district
and from RI, including such things as
Rotaract program and promotional materials;
training materials for new club officers;
information on special events like World
Rotaract Week (the week of 13 March); and
copies of monthly issues of THE ROTARIAN
magazine, the Rotary World newspaper,
and Rotaract News. Conversely, the District
Rotaract Representative should provide the
district and RI World Headquarters with
reports of exceptional club projects for
international promotion. Rotaract clubs can
help the District Rotaract Representative
strengthen the district communication
network by providing regular updates on
new club officers and address changes.
The District Rotaract Representative also
appoints the Rotaract district committee
(comprised of Rotaractors).
Rotaract District Committee
The District Rotaract Representative may
also appoint a Rotaract district committee
comprised of at least five Rotaract members
from various clubs in the district. The
number of members appointed to this
committee varies according to the size of
the district and the District Rotaract
Representative’s plans for the year. The
Rotaract district committee plans districtwide projects and activities, recommends
club service ideas to strengthen clubs, and
works with the Rotarians on the District
Rotaract Committee to organize new clubs
and district training sessions for Rotaract
club officers.
District Meetings
Two important district-wide Rotaract
meetings are held each year: the Rotaract
District Assembly and the Rotaract District
Conference.
Rotaract District Assembly
The purpose of the Rotaract District
Assembly is to provide training to the
incoming Rotaract club officers. The
Rotaract District Assembly can be held any
time after club open elections are held.
Normally, this is done before the Rotary
year in which the officers serve their term.
The meeting is planned and implemented
by the District Rotaract Representative and
District Rotaract Chairman, and their
respective committees.
Participants at the Rotaract District Assembly
include incoming Rotaract club officers,
directors and committee chairmen; current
and incoming District Rotaract Representatives; the District Governor; District
Rotaract Committee (consisting of
Rotarians); Rotaract district committee
(consisting of Rotaractors); Rotary club
Rotaract committee chairperson and
members; and Rotaract club advisors.
The conference should feature a mix of
general sessions and small group discussions
designed to provide training to Rotaract
club officers and committee chairpersons
and to develop rapport between the Rotaract
club leadership and the sponsoring Rotary
club and district leadership. Individual
sessions should be planned to discuss the
roles of the various club officers. General
sessions might address Rotaract activities
at the district level as well as provide an
opportunity for sharing ideas on service
activities and membership development
and retention. The program should be
developed jointly by the District Rotaract
Representative and the District Rotaract
Chairman and be approved by the District
Governor.Rotaract Handbook 13
General sessions should be led by the
District Rotaract Representative, with
assistance from the District Rotaract
Committee Chairperson. Group sessions
should be led by Rotaractors, with Rotarians
assigned to each group as resource specialists
to supply any necessary information and
guidance. This provides an excellent
opportunity for Rotaractors to develop
their leadership skills.
The Rotarians and Rotaractors on the
District Rotaract Committee and Rotaract
district committee, respectively, should
work together to plan all aspects of the
meeting. In addition to conducting the
meeting, the District Rotaract Representative
should recommend Rotaractors to serve as
discussion group leaders and also help
promote attendance at the meeting.
The expenses for all incoming Rotaract club
officers, directors and committee chairpersons are to be paid by the sponsoring
Rotary clubs, or where circumstances
dictate, by a mutually agreed-upon financial
arrangement involving the sponsoring
Rotary clubs, Rotary district and the
Rotaract participants. The District Governor
should approve the final financial proposal
for the Rotaract District Assembly.
Rotaract District Conference
A Rotaract District Conference gives
Rotaractors throughout the district a chance
to congregate and celebrate the year’s
successes. The conference also provides an
important forum for exchanging information
and ideas, evaluating completed projects
and planning new ones, and strengthening
the spirit of teamwork and friendship.
Every Rotaractor in the district should be
invited to the district conference, as well as
Rotarians on the District Rotaract Committee,
Rotaract club advisors and the District
Governor. The Rotaract District Conference
can be held at the end of May or in June
and should be held at a central location that
offers easy and economical access for
Rotaractors throughout the district. Keep in
mind that it shouldn’t conflict with the
Rotaract Pre-Convention Meeting.
All aspects of the meeting should be
planned by the Rotaractors and Rotarians
on the district committees. The current and
incoming District Rotaract Representatives
should have primary responsibility for
coordinating the meeting.
The cost of the conference can be covered
in various ways. Often, however, general
Rotaract club and district funds are used to
cover meeting expenses, and Rotaractors
pay a registration fee that includes meals,
entertainment and accommodations if the
meeting runs longer than one day.
There are no set guidelines for program
content, but it should be informative and
enjoyable. Based on the interests of the
district’s Rotaractors, the current and
incoming District Rotaract Representatives,
in consultation with the Rotaract district
committee, should plan a program that
motivates the participants and promotes
the formation of district-wide friendships.
The plenary sessions might feature speakers
from regional government agencies,
businesses, or community organizations
whose knowledge and insights would be
informative and inspirational for Rotaractors.
If the conference focuses on a specific theme
that the District Rotaract Representative
has developed over the year (e.g., drug
abuse prevention or literacy promotion),
choose speakers who specialize in related
fields. The plenary sessions also provide
an opportunity to spotlight the talents of
Rotaractors who are musicians, dancers,
or artists and to recognize individual
Rotaractors or clubs that have provided
outstanding service to their community
during the year. This is also a good time to
elect the District Rotaract Representative for
the following year, thus allowing a full year
for preparation and training for the office.
Discussion group sessions can follow any
number of formats, including: service
project workshops featuring panels of
specialists; idea exchange assemblies; or
group discussions on specific district
concerns, with group recommendations
reported on at an open forum during the
general session.14 Rotaract Handbook
Generally, a Rotaract club is asked to host
the meeting, which involves obtaining the
meeting place and organizing conference
logistics.
Contact your District Rotaract Representative
for the dates of these two meetings. For those
districts with only one or two Rotaract clubs,
these meetings are especially important
and should not be disregarded. However, if
resources are limited, it may prove more
productive to coordinate the Rotaract
District Assembly and/or Conference with
the Rotary District Assembly or Conference.
This gives Rotaractors direct contact with
Rotarians in the district and a better understanding of Rotary and increases Rotaract
visibility among Rotarians.
Multidistrict Activities,
Meetings and Organizations
Multidistrict activities are Rotaractsponsored service projects (other than
meetings) involving clubs in two or more
districts. For example, in Japan, Rotaractors
organize a multidistrict service project to
celebrate their “National Rotaract Day,”
generating publicity about Rotaract that
attracts new members.
To organize a multidistrict project, a Rotaract
district must provide RI World Headquarters
with documentation demonstrating the
approval of the District Rotaract Representatives and District Governors from the
participating districts, as well as support
from at least two-thirds of the Rotaract clubs
in each district. Once approved by the
General Secretary, the project must be directly
supervised by the District Rotaract Representatives, who should make it clear to the
clubs that participation is voluntary and costs
are to be covered by minimal contributions
rather than a mandatory per capita fee.
All groups undertaking multidistrict projects
should submit annual financial and descriptive progress reports on their projects —
along with photographs — to RI World
Headquarters. These reports are used to
feature successful multidistrict Rotaract
activities in the Rotary World newspaper,
THE ROTARIAN magazine, Rotaract News
and other RI publications.
Multidistrict meetings are conferences,
seminars or meetings which involve Rotaract
clubs from several districts coming together
to discuss issues of importance beyond the
district level. All such meetings require that
the host District Rotaract Representative
provide to the District Governors concerned
a copy of the meeting proposal which
describes the date, location, facilities,
participants, program, budget and proof
of adequate liability insurance. The host
governor must also approve any multidistrict meetings. The District Rotaract
Representative should inform the
RI director(s) from the zone(s) and the
RI General Secretary of the event.
Additionally, multidistrict meetings at the
worldwide level require the approval of the
RI director(s) from the zone and the approval
of the RI Board. Proposals for such meetings,
including all of the information noted above,
should be submitted by the host District
Rotaract Representative to Rotary International well in advance of the meeting to
ensure adequate time for RI Board
consideration.
Multidistrict organizations, frequently
called Multidistrict Information Organizations (MDIOs), may be formed for the
purpose of disseminating information and
facilitating communication between Rotaract
clubs in the districts concerned. Approval
for such organizations must be secured
from the governors of the districts involved
and the RI Board. Rotaract representatives
of the districts involved comprise the
membership of such organizations. Each
District Rotaract Representative may appoint
a member of his or her district organization,
as needed, to carry out the activities of the
multidistrict organization. Funds needed to
implement a multidistrict organization’s
activities must be obtained on a voluntary
basis only.
Multidistrict organizations have no decisionmaking or legislative powers, except for
decisions concerning activities of the organization, for which each member (District
Rotaract Representative) has one vote.Rotaract Handbook 15
Regional and
International Meetings
Rotaract Pre-Convention Meeting
The Rotaract Pre-Convention Meeting,
sponsored by Rotary International, brings
together Rotaractors and Rotarians from
around the world to share ideas for projects
and fellowship. This meeting, usually held
in June, immediately precedes the RI
Convention. It updates participants on new
Rotaract policies and activities, recognizes
outstanding Rotaract club projects around
the world and affords an opportunity for
Rotaractors to share their ideas with RI
officers and staff. This is a meeting that
every District Rotaract Representative and
club president should attend.
RI Convention
Rotaractors are invited and encouraged to
participate in the four-day RI Convention
that follows the Rotaract Pre-Convention
Meeting. Rotaractors take part in special
forums, workshops, the projects exhibition
and plenary sessions. Participation in the
RI Convention gives Rotaractors a broader
understanding of Rotary, its internationality
and its service to the world. It can provide
Rotaractors with a better sense of how
Rotaract fits into the Rotary family.
INTEROTA
INTEROTA is a worldwide Rotaract
meeting held every three years. It is an
opportunity for Rotaractors to sample
another culture, tour the local sights, and
see what kinds of activities and projects
their counterparts are developing. Past
INTEROTA meeting sites have included
South Africa, Turkey and Mexico.
Unlike the Rotaract Pre-Convention
Meeting, INTEROTA is not sponsored by
RI. Rather, Rotaractors compete with one
another to host INTEROTA. At the meeting,
delegations from various countries present
conference proposals for the upcoming
INTEROTA, and participants then vote to
select the next meeting site. Before a Rotaract
club or district makes a proposal to host
INTEROTA, they need to secure the approval
of their current District Governor and the
RI director from their region. Once a site is
selected, the hosting Rotaractors are required
to submit a proposal to the RI Board for
approval, as described in the “Rotaract Multidistrict Meetings” section of the RI Manual
of Procedure, and to ensure that their District
Governors and RI directors are kept informed
of the meeting plans in the years leading up
to the event.
While not an official Rotary International
meeting, RI recognizes the value of this
event and supports INTEROTA through
approval of its program content and by
ensuring representation of RI leadership
at this event.Rotaract Handbook 17
5
Rotaract
and Rotary
International
Program Administration
RI Secretariat and Rotaract
The RI Secretariat is made up of the RI World
Headquarters in Evanston, Illinois, U.S.A.
and its eight Service Centers in Argentina,
Australia, Brazil, India, Japan, Korea, the
Philippines, and Switzerland. RI staff are
committed to providing excellent service in
administering the Rotaract program worldwide. Addresses and phone/fax numbers for
RI Secretariat offices can be found on page 57.
Communication
Good communication between RI, Rotaract
clubs and sponsoring Rotary clubs is key to
the health and growth of this important
program. To facilitate this, program mailings
are sent each year from RI World Headquarters providing program updates,
information on new publications, and
announcements about special activities
such as World Rotaract Week and the
Rotaract Pre-Convention Meeting.
Rotaract clubs should make a special effort
to keep RI informed of their activities.
RI President’s Theme
Each year the new RI president introduces
a special theme that aims to unite the service
projects of your Rotaract club and sponsoring
Rotary club with those of Rotaract and
Program Policies
Guiding policies for the Rotaract program
come from the RI Board (which consists of
18 past District Governors from around the
world) and the RI president (who is elected
annually by the Rotary clubs). Each year the
RI president appoints a Rotaract committee
whose role is to advise the Board on proposed
changes in program policy. Rotaractors and
Rotarians wishing to propose changes to
the Rotaract program should work through
either this committee or the Board member
from their region to bring their suggestions
to the attention of the Board.
Changes to the Rotaract program that would
affect the constitution and by-laws of
Rotary International or the RI-prescribed
constitution and by-laws of Rotary clubs
must be considered and acted upon by the
Council on Legislation. The Council on
Legislation is the legislative body of RI.
The Rotaract program does not have a
separate legislative body for considering
constitutional amendments. If a Rotaract
club supports such a change, consideration
of the proposal should be pursued through
the sponsoring Rotary club. A sponsoring
Rotary club is not obliged to submit such a
proposal on behalf of the Rotaract club to
the Council on Legislation.18 Rotaract Handbook
Rotary clubs around the world. Through
this theme, the president invites Rotaract
clubs to take part in a global effort to improve
world understanding and peace.
RI Rotaract Committee
Each year the RI president appoints an
international committee to serve in an
advisory capacity to the Board regarding
the Rotaract program. It has become
customary for the committee to include
both Rotarians and Rotaractors from around
the world. Rotaractors and Rotarians who
wish to make proposals to the Board
regarding the Rotaract program should
work through the RI Rotaract Committee.
Rotaractors interested in serving on this
committee should have a Rotarian write to
the RI president-elect recommending him
or her as a worthy candidate for consideration. All committee appointments are made
at the discretion of the president-elect.
Rotaract Club Certification,
Registration and Termination
The RI Secretariat acts as a central administrator for Rotaract clubs. Each new Rotaract
club is required to submit a “Rotaract Club
Organization List” to the office of the RI
Service Center serving its area and a club
organization fee equivalent to US$50. This
information becomes part of a computerized
list of officially organized Rotaract clubs
maintained at RI World Headquarters,
making it possible to promote international
and regional communication among
Rotaract clubs.
Each year, a Rotaract club is required to
provide updated address information to
RI World Headquarters to ensure the
records are accurate.
RI will terminate Rotaract clubs* if mail is
returned to the Secretariat and RI staff are
unable to reach the club president through
the District Rotaract Representative, the
District Rotaract Chairman, the sponsoring
Rotary club secretary, or the District Governor. These individuals will have 90 days to
provide updated contact information to RI,
after which time the Rotaract club will be
terminated. This policy makes it essential
for Rotaract clubs to submit the names and
addresses of their club presidents or contact
persons each year, so that not only can the
correct club information appear in the
Worldwide Rotaract Directory, but also so  that
active Rotaract clubs are not terminated. In
addition, if at any time during the Rotary
year a Rotaract club president or contact
person’s address changes, he or she must
notify Rotary International so that mail sent
from the Secretariat is not returned as
undeliverable.
If a Rotaract club wishes to be reinstated
after having been terminated by Rotary
International, they may do so at any time
provided they have the support of their
sponsoring Rotary club. If the Rotaract club
wishes to be reinstated within one year of
their official termination by RI, then the
Rotaract club is not required to pay the US$50
certification fee. If, however, a Rotaract club
has been officially terminated for a period
of more than one year, it must pay the US$50
certification fee in order to be officially
reinstated with Rotary International.
Services
Worldwide Rotaract Directory
Each year, the Official Directory section of
the Secretariat mails to all Rotaract clubs a
“Rotaract Data Form” to verify each club’s
contact information and activity. Returning
the form prior to 1 April guarantees that
your club will be included in the Worldwide
Rotaract Directory. These reports should be
sent to:
Official Directory
Rotary International
One Rotary Center
1560 Sherman Avenue
Evanston, IL 60201, USA
Fax: 847-328-8554
By submitting the Rotaract Annual Report
form, clubs can indicate their interest in
participating in international Home Hosting
and Partner Club projects.
* For a complete listing of other reasons for which a Rotaract club may be terminated, please see Article III,
Section 5 of the Standard Rotaract Club Constitution and Section 19 of the Rotaract Statement of Policy.Rotaract Handbook 19
THE ROTARIAN, Rotary World and
Rotaract News
The RI Secretariat also develops promotional
pieces to help the Rotaract program. Foremost among RI publications are THE
ROTARIAN, Rotary World and Rotaract News.
THE ROTARIAN, published monthly, is the
official magazine of RI and an international
magazine for business and professional
people. Rotary World is a newspaper
published five times a year that includes
reports on innovative club and district
projects in communities around the world.
Rotaract News is the biannual newsletter
published exclusively for the Rotaract
audience. To enhance these publications,
Rotaract clubs are asked each year to submit
to RI photographs and “Project Report
Forms” (see pages 53-54) detailing their
community and international service
projects. Your club’s communication with
the RI Secretariat is essential in promoting
the worldwide success of Rotaract.
Every registered Rotaract club should receive
a copy of Rotary World and Rotaract News.
If your club does not receive a copy it may
not be correctly registered, and you should
contact RI World Headquarters immediately.
Special Events
World Rotaract Week
During the week in which 13 March falls,
Rotaract clubs and their sponsors join in a
worldwide celebration of World Rotaract
Week. This celebration coincides with the
date that the first Rotaract club was officially
certified by Rotary International. In celebration of this week, Rotaract clubs are
invited to join with their Rotary club
sponsors to carry out partner activities.Rotaract Handbook 21
6
Resources
One of the primary goals of Rotaract clubs
is to provide service both locally and
internationally. Rotary International and
The Rotary Foundation have a variety of
programs, activities and emphases to support
the efforts of both Rotary and Rotaract clubs
in developing their service projects. The
following section details Rotary International and Rotary Foundation programs,
activities and emphases and explains how
your Rotaract club can obtain additional
information. Publications listed as resources
below can be ordered from the latest RI Catalog
(019-EN), or by completing the “Publication
Order Form” found on page 35 and sending
it to the Service Center for your area.
In addition, RI’s Web site (www.rotary.org)
has a wealth of information.
Resources of Rotary
International
The RI Programs Department acts as a
clearinghouse for information on club and
district service activities worldwide.
Through its program publications and
Projects Database, programs staff can help
Rotaractors develop effective service projects
by sharing the experience and knowledge
of others from around the world.
The Projects Database contains several
hundred project models and ideas along
with project contact information and
resource organizations, providing concise
information on Community, Vocational and
International Service projects. Rotarians
and Rotaractors are encouraged to submit
their projects for possible inclusion so that
others might benefit from their experience.
To obtain information from the Projects
Database, contact the Programs Department
at RI World Headquarters, specifying what
types of project examples you are interested
in receiving.
AIDS
The RI Board encourages Rotary clubs to
work with governmental health agencies
and non-governmental organizations to
increase awareness among their membership
and the broader community about AIDS
education and prevention. Rotary clubs
have been asked by the Board to use
United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS
(UNAIDS) materials in expanding collaborative activities with Rotaractors and
Interactors. Rotaractors can be key leaders
in enhancing AIDS awareness among their
peers, working within cultural and community
sensitivities.
For more information, consult the RI publication, Rotary Responds to AIDS (604-EN).
Children at Risk
Recognizing that children are an especially
vulnerable population and need special
care and protection, RI’s Children at Risk
emphasis encourages clubs to undertake
projects to alleviate the hardships suffered
by children living in exceptionally difficult
conditions in order to enable them to grow
into adulthood in an environment of peace,
dignity, tolerance, freedom and equality.
This emphasis is an extension of RI’s22 Rotaract Handbook
endorsement and support of the rights of
all children to food, shelter, health care,
education and freedom from abuse and
violence, regardless of race, creed or
nationality. Service projects encompassed
by the Children at Risk emphasis focus on
hunger, literacy and primary education,
health care and immunization, safe communities and schools, drug and alcohol abuse
prevention, alleviating homelessness and
promoting stable and nurturing homes.
Concern for the Aging
As people’s life expectancy expands, concern
for the aging is a growing need in many
communities. This Community Service
activity is designed to encourage Rotary
and Rotaract clubs to undertake projects that
respond to the social, physical, vocational,
and educational needs of senior citizens.
Concern for the aging projects incorporate
senior citizens into community activities
and help break down generational barriers.
For more information, consult the RI publication Learning from Experience (621-EN).
Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Prevention
Through its emphasis on drug and alcohol
abuse prevention, RI is drawing attention to a
problem of global proportions. Rotary and
Rotaract clubs are encouraged to undertake
service projects that help reduce substance
abuse in the community, particularly through
educational programs on the dangers of
drug and alcohol abuse. Given the importance of addressing this problem as early as
possible, Rotaractors are in an ideal position
both to influence younger children and
their peers with respect to this issue.
For more information, consult the RI publication, Combating Substance Abuse (627-EN).
Interact
Interact is an international organization of
service and social clubs for young people
ages 14-18 that fosters leadership and
responsible citizenship and promotes international understanding and peace. Each
Interact club is sponsored by a local Rotary
club — which acts as an advisor — but
clubs are self-governing and self-supporting.
Each year, Interact clubs complete a community service project and a project that
furthers international understanding and
goodwill. Interact is also a social organization. Interactors develop a worldwide
network of friends through exchanges with
local clubs and those from different countries.
Interactors within a community serve as
excellent future prospects for the local
Rotaract club.
For more information, consult the Interact
Handbook (654-EN) or your District Interact
Chairperson.
Hunger Alleviation
Poverty is on the rise and one of its chief
effects is hunger. RI encourages Rotary and
Rotaract clubs to undertake projects to
alleviate starvation; to substantially reduce
malnutrition and mortality among children;
to tangibly reduce chronic hunger; and to
eliminate major diseases resulting from
inadequate nutrition.
Consult Combating Hunger and Poverty
Through Rotary (307-EN) for further
information.
Literacy and Numeracy Promotion
RI’s Literacy and Numeracy program
addresses the critical need of increasing
people’s functional literacy levels and basic
math skills. Rotary and Rotaract clubs are
asked to examine community literacy and
numeracy needs and develop appropriate
projects such as adult literacy classes, or
reading programs for children.
For more information, consult the RI publication, Rotary Promotes Literacy (601-EN).
Preserve Planet Earth Program
The Preserve Planet Earth program seeks to
address rising concerns over the state of the
environment. Rotaract and Rotary clubs can
help to increase ecological and environmental
awareness in their homes, communities, and
throughout the world. Whenever possible,
clubs should try to incorporate environmental protection components into all
ongoing community and international
service projects.
For further information, consult the
Preserve Planet Earth Handbook (378-EN).Rotaract Handbook 23
Rotary Community Corps
(RCC) Program
The Rotary Community Corps program
encourages Rotary and Rotaract clubs to
identify service-minded non-Rotarians with
leadership potential who require organizational and technical assistance to carry out
local community development projects.
Through Rotary club sponsorship, RCCs
are organized and receive Rotary, Rotaract,
or Interact assistance to advance their
projects. The purpose of the RCC program
is to promote grass-roots, self-help projects;
develop local leadership abilities; maximize
local resources; and use appropriate costefficient technology.
For more information, consult the Rotary
Community Corps Handbook (770-EN).
Rotary Volunteers Program
The Rotary Volunteers program links
Rotarians and spouses, Rotaractors, Rotary
Foundation scholars, and non-Rotarians
with exciting volunteer opportunities in
community and international service
projects. The Rotary Volunteers program
is designed to create greater awareness
among Rotarians/Rotaractors of volunteer
opportunities within their own and other
communities, provide expertise or skills not
available within the community to service
projects, and increase and facilitate participation in all types of volunteer activities.
Rotaractors interested in volunteering their
expertise to a service project should begin
by seeking out community and district
opportunities. Those Rotaractors unable
to identify such opportunities and willing
to volunteer outside the district, should
contact the district Vocational Service chairperson and complete the RI registration
form for Rotary volunteer opportunities.
Volunteers are expected to independently
follow up on possible Rotary or non-Rotary
projects which could use their volunteer
expertise.
For more information, consult the Rotary
Volunteers Handbook (263-EN).
Rotary Youth Leadership Awards
(RYLA)
Organized at the Rotary club, district or
multidistrict level, RYLA seminars focus on
topics of interest to students and young
professionals. Participants exchange ideas,
explore career paths, learn more about
Rotary, gain insights for organizing youth
and community service projects, and
discuss approaches for resolving family,
social, and professional problems.
The connection between Rotaract and RYLA
works on many levels. In some cases,
Rotaractors are selected by their Rotary
clubs to participate in RYLA seminars.
Rotaract clubs may work with a Rotary club
or district RYLA committee to organize the
seminar. RYLA seminars also provide
Rotaract clubs with a pool of excellent
candidates for Rotaract membership.
Those Rotaractors interested in learning
more about RYLA activities should contact
their sponsoring Rotary club or District
Governor or consult the RI publication,
Rotary Youth Leadership Awards Guidelines
(694-EN).
Urban Peace and
Conflict Resolution
Rotarians’ efforts in the arenas of urban
peace and conflict resolution focus on areas
of concern to all communities, including
community terrorism, gun violence,
domestic/family violence, ethnic and
religious intolerance, deteriorating inner
cities, lack of recreational facilities, alternative dispute resolution, homelessness and
unemployment. Rotarians and Rotaractors
are encouraged to demonstrate their
commitment to urban peace through
projects and activities in these areas.
For more information, consult Building
Peace in the Community (377-EN).24 Rotaract Handbook
World Community Service
(WCS) Program
The purpose of the World Community
Service program is to encourage international
cooperation; carry out projects to improve
living standards and satisfy basic needs;
and increase international understanding
and goodwill through professional, technical,
and material assistance. A World Community
Service project is one in which two clubs
from different countries join forces to address
a community need by providing international funding, volunteer assistance, or
material support. The World Community
Service Projects Exchange (754-EN) lists
projects needing international Rotary and
Rotaract club partners. Rotaract clubs may
also list projects that need support in the
WCS Projects Exchange with the endorsement
of the sponsoring Rotary club. The WCS
Projects Exchange can also be found on
RI’s Web site.
Another WCS resource is the Donationsin-kind Information Network (DIN), a
database listing goods and services donated
by Rotarians and Rotaractors for use in
WCS projects.
For more information and registration
forms for this program, consult the World
Community Service Handbook: A Guide to
Action (742-EN).
Youth Exchange
The Youth Exchange program sends students
of secondary school age to engage in study
or travel abroad for up to one academic year
in order to advance international understanding and goodwill. Youth Exchange
students, typically between the ages of 15
and 19, live with host families and experience first-hand life, culture and education
in another country. Sponsored by sending
and receiving Rotary clubs or districts, the
exchangees are selected according to
guidelines and procedures suggested by
the RI Board. Returned Youth Exchange
students are a great source of potential
Rotaract members.
For more information, consult the Youth
Exchange Handbook (746-EN) or your district
Youth Exchange chairperson.
Resources of
The Rotary Foundation
Through its humanitarian, educational and
cultural exchange programs, The Rotary
Foundation provides financial assistance
to international Rotary/Rotaract service
projects that aim to increase world understanding and peace. The guidelines used in
judging applications for financial assistance
require that projects involve two or more
countries and subscribe to established
criteria set by The Rotary Foundation
Trustees. In addition, funding is available
for international scholarships.
Discovery Grants
Discovery Grants subsidize the advance
planning activities of Rotary clubs and
districts designing significant international
service projects by contributing to the travel,
food and ancillary expenses of individuals
selected by the sponsor club or district to
travel from one country to another to
further such planning. Discovery Grants of
up to US$3,000 permit teams of Rotarians
or teams of experts led by at least one
Rotarian to travel to another country for
an unrestricted length of time.
For more information, consult the booklet
Humanitarian Grants Programs (130-EN).
Grants for Rotary Volunteers
The Grants for Rotary Volunteers program
allocates stipends to cover travel and per
diem expenses for Rotarians, Rotary
Foundation alumni, and Rotaractors who
serve as international service volunteers for
a minimum of four weeks in a Rotary or
non-Rotary international service project. To
be eligible for funding, prospective volunteers must first be registered with the RI
Rotary Volunteers program.
For more information, consult the booklet
Humanitarian Grants Programs (130-EN).Rotaract Handbook 25
Group Study Exchange (GSE)
Awards are given to Rotary districts to send
teams of four business or professional people
to visit another country for four to six weeks
to study its business institutions, observe
professions as practiced in the host country,
and experience a different way of life. The
Rotary Foundation provides funding for
round-trip transportation. Host Rotarians
pay expenses directly associated with the
visiting team’s study tour. (Children and
grandchildren of Rotarians are not eligible
for Group Study Exchange awards.)
For more information, consult the Group
Study Exchange brochure (160-EN).
Health, Hunger and Humanity
(3-H) Grants
A 3-H Grant provides funding for largescale (US$100,000 to US$500,000) one- to
five-year international humanitarian service
projects that are designed to improve health,
alleviate hunger, enhance human and social
development, and advance international
understanding, goodwill and peace. The
project must involve Rotary clubs from two
or more countries. Rotaractors can participate
in 3-H projects, but informally.
For more information, consult the booklet
Humanitarian Grants Programs (130-EN).
Helping Grants for International
Humanitarian Projects
Helping Grants are designed to provide
support for humanitarian service projects
in areas of the world where there is no local
Rotary club or where a local club cannot
significantly contribute to a project. These
grants provide up to US$15,000, matching
one dollar for every two contributed by a
sponsoring club or district. Although projects
may be funded and monitored by Rotaractors,
the Rotaractors’ sponsoring Rotary clubs
must approve and sign Helping Grant
applications.
For more information, consult the booklet
Humanitarian Grants Programs (130-EN).
Matching Grants for International
Humanitarian Projects
A Matching Grant offers matched financial
assistance up to US$50,000 for the purpose
of advancing an international Rotary service
project. These grants match international
Rotary/Rotaract club contributions or
project funds raised jointly between the
project’s sponsor club and an international
Rotary or Rotaract club partner. Although
projects may be funded and monitored by
Rotaractors, the Rotaractors’ sponsoring
Rotary clubs must approve and sign
Matching Grant applications.
For more information, consult the booklet
Humanitarian Grants Programs (130-EN).
Rotary Foundation
Ambassadorial Scholarships
Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarships fund study in another country, during
which time scholars serve as goodwill
ambassadors and are available to speak
about their homeland. Upon return, scholars
give talks on their international experiences
with an aim to increase world understanding. Scholarships are available for one, two
or three academic years. In addition, there
are cultural ambassadorial scholarships for
intensive language training and cultural
study in another country for either three
or six months. (Children and grandchildren
of Rotarians are not eligible for these
scholarships.)
To learn more about availability, eligibility
and deadlines, consult the Rotary Foundation
Ambassadorial Scholarships leaflet (132-EN).Other Resources
Other sources of information include the
following Internet sites.
www.rotaract.org — This site, called the
Global Rotaract Information Center, is an
extensive source of information relating to
the Rotaract program. It includes details
about Rotaract clubs and districts worldwide, hot topic chat rooms, free e-mail and
events listings. This site also contains a
Press Room that lists current Rotaract
events and announcements, an on-line
Rotaract Handbook, and information on
Rotary-Rotaract partnerships.
www.rotaract.de/service/ — This site, maintained by two German Rotaractors, contains
a searchable database of Rotary, Rotaract
and Interact projects. All types of project
descriptions are readily accessible for
downloading, and there is an area where
individual clubs can enter information
about their own service activities.
www.icufr.org — The International Computer Users Fellowship of Rotarians, or
ICUFR, is an official Fellowship for
Rotarians who use computer-based technology in their everyday lives. This site
contains several links to Rotary club and
district Web sites around the world, as well
as the Rotarians On-line Conference Center,
or ROCC. The ROCC includes chat rooms
on a variety of Rotary-related subjects as
well as message posting forums for topics
that range from developments in Web
technology to jokes and anecdotes.
http://roti.ultra.net.au/index.html —
Rotarians on the Internet, or ROTI, is
another Fellowship for those interested in
combining their affiliation with Rotary and
their passion for the Internet. The Rotarians
who maintain this site are dedicated to
keeping track of all Rotary clubs that have
a presence on the Internet. Contained in
this site are links to Rotary clubs and
districts worldwide, 24-hour chat rooms,
on-line Rotary manuals, and many other
features.
26 Rotaract HandbookRotaract Handbook 27
7
Rotaract
in Action
● The Rotaract Club of Kampala, Uganda,
used its “Bandwe Community Health
Project” to improve the social welfare and
quality of life of the Bandwe community
by providing both basic and general health
care services to local people. The area
has a population of approximately 30,000
but does not have a health center to meet
residents’ health needs. Through the
Bandwe project, the club offers services
which include disease immunization
(including polio), dental services, and
primary health care talks on family
planning, hygiene, nutrition and dental
care, to name a few. In its early days the
club project did not have a permanent
structure, and immunizations were carried
out under a tree and in a school classroom.
Thanks to the monetary and moral
support of the District Governor and a
Rotarian from the Rotary club of Mengo,
the Rotaractors’ Rotary sponsor, a permanent health care facility has been erected.
● Thalassaemia is an inherited blood
disorder that keeps the afflicted person
from producing blood of his/her own,
making regular transfusions necessary.
The disease, for which there is currently
no cure, is most common among small
children and is growing at alarming
rates. The treatment for this disease is
not only agonizing, but very expensive.
There is no limit to the creativity and enthusiasm
employed by Rotaract clubs in carrying out both
local and international projects. Below is a
sampling of noteworthy Rotaract projects
worldwide that provides clubs with ideas for
initiating their own service projects.
● In response to devastation caused by
flooding in North Gujarat State in India,
the Rotaract Club of Visnagar undertook
the “Epidemic Preventive Efforts (Disaster
Relief Operation)” project to help shoulder
the responsibility of epidemic prevention.
In the wake of the floods, many residents
were killed, thousands were left homeless, drinking water was contaminated,
cattle died, and homes and roads were
damaged or destroyed. Working with a
preventative health clinic run by their
Rotary club sponsor, they helped curb
the spread of diseases, including malaria
and cholera. In addition to the health
initiatives, a disease awareness campaign
was undertaken, chlorine tablets were
distributed to every residence in Visnagar
city, and dead animal carcasses were
burned. Many Rotarians, Rotaractors,
Interactors and those involved with Inner
Wheel and Rotary Community Corps
from neighboring clubs pitched in and
worked together with various government
agencies and non-governmental organizations to make this project a success.28 Rotaract Handbook
The Rotaract Club of East Calcutta,
India, began addressing the issue in 1991
through a blood donation camp, which
then grew into a district-wide project
which included awareness programs
and projects with local clubs and schools
in the community. The success of their
project has inspired other Rotaract clubs
from India, Israel, Turkey and England
to see how they can work together to
help fight the spread of this disease.
● The Rotaract Club of Curitiba Cidade
Sorriso, Brazil, is consistent in its
ongoing service to the local community.
Their “Brazilian Citizenship Project” is
one of many of their successful joint
Rotary-Rotaract projects that provides
needy community residents with
information, instruction and support
to solve problems in the areas of health,
education, law, recreation and culture,
and ecology. Club members organize twoday seminars with lecturers from many
government, non-government, public
and private agencies. The specialists
provide community members with
practical advice and information on
health, environmental, and local neighborhood issues.
● The Rotaract Club of Novi Ligure, Italy,
sensitive to the social and economical
problems of their community, decided to
promote entrepreneurship, with the goal
of motivating an entrepreneurial spirit
among local youth and making the public
aware of the importance of a thriving
business community in their region. In
cooperation with their city council, a
local savings bank and the sponsoring
Rotary club of Novi Ligure, a series of
five lectures relating to business, finance,
communication and technology was
presented to the public over a period of
four months. In addition to the lecture,
a 40-hour series of free training courses
was provided to young professionals
and potential entrepreneurs, starting in
October and ending in December. These
formative seminars were designed to
teach the participants about the specific
‘ins and outs’ of small- and medium-size
businesses competing in today’s global
economy, as well as the practical steps
needed to get started.
• The Twin Cities Rotaract Club of
Minneapolis-St. Paul, USA, purchased a
two-seat recumbent-style bicycle and
donated it to a school serving physically
and mentally disabled students. This
community service project provides
present and future students of Highview
Middle School with the opportunity to
enjoy the simple pleasure of a bicycle
ride. They are also in partnership with
the Rotaract Club of Minsk, Belarus, to
collect clothing, school supplies and
other packaged goods to send to a
specialized orphan house in Rudensk,
Belarus. The local club in Belarus arranges
the delivery of the clothing and supplies
once the packages arrive in Rudensk.
The efforts of these Rotaract clubs resulted
in a great deal of media exposure in
newspaper articles and local television
coverage, which has led to an increased
awareness of Rotaract in their local
communities.
• “Project Golden Child,” an ambitious
four-day camp dedicated to improving
the lives of children living with cancer,
was undertaken by the Rotaract clubs of
District 3300, Malaysia. Rotaractors and
Rotarians from all over Malaysia and
Singapore, as well as other outside
organizations who donated their time,
money and expertise, helped to make the
dream of Project Golden Child a reality.
A committed group of Rotaractors
undertook innovative fundraising projects
to raise awareness of the challenges
faced by these children and also took on
the role of “big brother/big sister” by
getting to know these children and their
families on  a personal level. The project
was publicized in the media, and an
informational souvenir booklet was
produced, highlighting the extensive
activities that took place. Besides engaging
these children in life-affirming and
esteem-building activities, Project Golden
Child also provided a respite for parents
and families of these children. The
Rotaractors who participated in the
project stated that in the four days they
learned the spirit of teamwork, gained
the strength to overcome their fears and
deepened their desire and ability to
share love.Rotaract Handbook 29
• The Rotaract Clubs of Moscow, Russia,
and Adalar (Istanbul), Turkey, cosponsored two classical concerts to
benefit needy children. The concerts
featured an internationally recognized
Russian chamber ensemble. The Russian
Rotaractors handled the logistical and
travel arrangements for the trio’s visit to
Turkey, while the Turkish Rotaractors
arranged for the concert hall, publicized
the concert and sold tickets, and provided
host family accommodations for the
visiting musicians. The two Rotaract
clubs split the proceeds, with each club
using its share to support a children’s
organization. In Moscow, a children’s
clinic for nervous disorders was the
beneficiary, while the Turkish Rotaractors
donated their portion of the profits to a
local orphanage.Rotaract Handbook 31
8
Administrative Forms and
Constitutional Documents
This section contains all the necessary forms, pertinent documents and relevant lists needed for Rotaract
club operation. Pages in this section may be removed for photocopying. Photocopies may serve as
originals. Below is a list of the materials you will find in this section with their page numbers.
List of Materials
Licensed Suppliers for Rotaract Emblem Merchandise  32
Specification for Rotaract Emblem  33
Rotaract Resource List  34
RI Publication Order Form  35
Standard Rotaract Club Constitution   37
Rotaract Statement of Policy  41
Summary of Rotaract Plans and Objectives  45
Rotaract Club Organization List  47
Rotaract Membership Application  49
Notice of Rotaract Alumnus (Potential Rotarian)  50
Rotaract Member Guide  51
Rotaract Annual Project Reports  53
Rotary International Calendar  55
Service Centers and Regional Offices of the RI Secretariat  5732 Rotaract Handbook
Licensed Suppliers for Rotaract Emblem
Merchandise
Please help protect the Rotaract emblem from illegal use. Should you choose to purchase merchandise
bearing the Rotaract emblem, please confirm that the individual or firm from whom you’ve purchased a
product is licensed by Rotary International.
Below is a list of firms licensed by Rotary International to produce the Rotaract emblem on merchandise
for sale. If you discover an individual or firm selling emblem merchandise not listed below, please
contact the Service Center for your area or the Licensing Section at RI World Headquarters in Evanston.
Please note that the information listed below was accurate at the time of printing but may not be current
at the time you refer to it.  For the most up-to-date list of licensees, consult the Official Directory.
ARGENTINA
Ghirimoldi Y Lerose, S.C.P.A.,
Uruguay 247-49, 1015 Buenos Aires
C.F. Tel: 54-1-372-8060
AUSTRALIA
John Giles Pty. Ltd., 2 Green St.,
Revesby, N.S.W. 2015. Tel: 61-2-699-
1455; Fax: 61-2-699-9903
Patrick Australia Pty. Ltd., 84-88
Leveson Street, North Melbourne,
Vic. 3051. Tel: 61-3-329-9200; Fax: 61-
3-326-5010
R.D.U. Pty. Ltd., P.O. Box 604,
Parramatta, N.S.W. 2150. Tel: 61-2-
633-4888; Fax: 61-2-891-5984;
E-mail: rduinc@msn.com;
Internet: www.rotarnet.com.au
CANADA
Russell-Hampton Canada Ltd.,
384 Westney Rd. S.; P.O. Box 426,
Ajax, Ont. L1S 3C5. Tel: 905-427-
2379; Fax: 905-427-9102
ENGLAND
A.W. Matthews, 54, High Street,
Gillingham, Kent, ME7 1BA. Tel: 44-
1634-853020; Fax: 44-1634-576330
Toye, Kenning & Spencer Limited,
Regalia House, Newtown Road,
Bedworth, Warwickshire, CV12
8QR. Tel: 44-121-236-3615; Fax: 44-
121-236-7217
FRANCE
Toye Kenning & Spencer Ltd.,
(Agent — SECAL, Ltd.) Passage Le
Dauphin, 34200 Sete. Tel: 33 67 46 15
43; Fax: 33 67 74 63 74
GERMANY
M.A. Wilm, Ballindamm 26, D-
20095 Hamburg. Tel: 49-46-5145454;
Fax: 49-40-331357
HONG KONG
Harilela’s, 29-43 Ashley Rd.,
Kowloon Centre, 2/Fl., TST; P.O.
Box 98508, Kowloon. Tel: 852-3-
692114; Fax: 852-3-7214266
INDIA
Better Services, 22 Meghna, 64 S.V.
Road, Santacruz (W), Mumbai
400054. Tel: 91-22-545152; Fax: 91-22-
6498201
Gupta’s Arts & Crafts, 11-6-31
Station Rd., Anakapalle 531001.
Tel: 91-8924-2336; Fax: 91-8924-2222
JAPAN
G. Ikoma, Ltd., 2-12, 2-chome,
Hiranomachi, Higashiku, Osaka,
Osaka. Tel: 81-6-231-0751; Fax: 81-6-
231-0766
Octon Inc., 3-21 Kanda Sakuma-cho,
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101. Tel: 81-3-
3866-0481; Fax: 81-3-3861-2090
Seki-Bikodo Co. Ltd., 7-38 Tenneijimachi, Aizau-Wakamatsu,
Fukushima. Tel: 81-242-29-4875;
Fax: 81-242-29-6055
Wako Company Ltd., 4-5 Ginza,
Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104. Tel: 81-3-3562-
2111; Fax: 81-3-3562-0957
NEW ZEALAND
RDU Proprietary Limited,
Box 128-166, Remuera, Auckland.
Tel: 64-09-529-4400, 0800-738-695;
Fax: 64-09-529-4500; E-mail:
rotarydu@xtra.co.nz; Internet:
www.rotarydownunder.co.nz
SWEDEN
Sporrong AB, Box 98, 18211
Danderyd. Tel: 46-8-622-6840;
Fax: 46-8-622-6672
TAIWAN
B & E Enterprises Company
Limited, No. 37 Chuan Chow Street,
P.O. Box 72-40, Taipei. Tel: 886-2-
305-2861, 886-2-305-2891; Fax: 886-2-
301-4288, 886-2-304-7963
U.S.A.
All-American Specialty Co., 6019
W. Howard St., Niles, Illinois  60714.
Tel: 847-588-2580; Fax: 847-588-2146
American Logo Works, 280 Route 9
North & Union Hill Road,
Morganville, NJ  07751. Tel: 732-536-
6561/800-962-7055; Fax: 732-536-
6902; E-mail: amerlogo@
sprynet.com
C.H. Wallbank Co., 1524 VFW
Pkway., Rte. 1, West Roxbury,
Massachusetts 02132. Tel: 617-323-
8562; Fax: 617-323-9623
The Gerry White Pin Co., 4024
Keats Drive, Sarasota, Florida 34241.
Tel: 941-342-6060; Fax: 941-377-5041;
E-mail: bagnew@gte.net
Russell-Hampton Co. Inc., 15440 W.
109th St., Lenexa, Kansas 66219.
Tel: 800-841-1777; Fax: 913-599-3353;
E-mail: orders@ruh.com;
Internet: www.ruh.com
Wayside Furniture Shops Inc.,
P.O. Box 5280, Milford, Connecticut 06460. Tel: 203-878-1781
.Rotaract Handbook 33
Specification for Rotaract Emblem
The emblem of Rotaract is a round emblem with a capital “R” superimposed over five horizontal and
six vertical curved lines in the center circular space. These elements are designed in accordance with the
proportions given in the table below. With the “R” standing vertically, the word “ROTARACT” is centered
directly above and is contained within the exterior ring. This lettering is raised from depressed space.
The outside edge is a perfectly round raised wall to contain all the elements. The proportions for the
correct design are:
overall diameter 78 units
width of exterior (red) ring 12 units
width of both (gold) circles 3 units
diameter of inner circle 42 units
height of R at vertical 31 units
width of R at top 23 units
width of R at bottom 26 units
width of vertical bar on R 5-1/2 units
height of letters 8 units
width of the letter O 11 units
The Rotaract colors are deep red and gold and
should be worked into the emblem as follows:
The depressed space in the exterior ring is
deep red. All raised lettering and detail is gold.34 Rotaract Handbook
Rotaract Resource List
Below is a list of Rotary publications and materials that may be helpful in organizing and sponsoring a
new Rotaract club in your community. These items may be ordered from the office of the RI Secretariat
serving your area. Consult the RI Catalog or your RI Service Center for pricing and lot size.
Rotaract Handbook
This is a newly revised publication that
contains the basic steps for organizing a
Rotaract club, including how to start and
manage a Rotaract club; it also provides
resource information and examples of
community service projects.
Order no. 562-EN.
Rotaract Club Organization List
Club organization list, to be completed by
the new Rotaract club officers, signed by
their sponsoring Rotary club president and
the District Governor, then submitted to RI.
When the completed form is received at RI,
the “Rotaract Club Certificate of Organization” is issued.
Order no. 672-EN. Also included in the
Rotaract Handbook.
Rotaract: Building A Better Tomorrow
Promotional brochure, informing new and
potential members about club activities and
purpose.
Order no. 663-EN.
Standard Rotaract Club
Constitution
Order no. 661-EN. Also included in the
Rotaract Handbook.
Rotaract Statement of Policy
Order no. 660-EN. Also included in the
Rotaract Handbook.
Rotaract Membership Application Form
Included in the Rotaract Handbook.
Rotaract Identification Cards
Wallet-size ID cards for club members.
Order no. 665-EN.
Rotaract Member Guide
Informative guide for new club members to
orient them to the Rotaract structure,
policy, and service areas. Included in the
Rotaract Handbook.
Worldwide Rotaract Directory
Directory with annual Rotaract statistics,
and names and addresses of District
Rotaract Representatives and Chairpersons,
all certified Rotaract clubs around the
world, and regional Rotary magazines.
Gratis, annual distribution to all District
Rotaract Representatives and active Rotaract
clubs.Rotaract Handbook 35
RI Publication Order Form
(Please print clearly.)
Name
Shipping Address City
State/Province Country Postal/Zip Code
Rotaract Club                                                                Sponsoring Rotary Club District
Daytime Telephone Number
METHOD OF PAYMENT:
Remittance enclosed
Please charge my credit card* (US$20 minimum on all charges)
VISA MasterCard 
If paying by credit card, please fill out the following:
Name of cardholder
Signature (as shown on card)
Card Number  Expiration date
(Month/Year)
Unit Cost (US$)
Title Catalog No. Language Quantity or Gratis Total (US$)
Subtotal
Total Due
Prices of RI Catalog items
include the costs of shipping
and handling.
To avoid duplicate billing, please
fax or mail this form, not both.
Received
FD 214
Tel. (847) 866-4600
0800 – 1700 hours, Central Time (U.S.A.),
Monday – Friday
Prices are subject to change without notice.
*Credit card charges may be made to the World Headquarters only.
Send this form to the RI Service Center serving your club. If sending to
World Headquarters, please use the following address or fax number:
RI Publications Order Services Section
Rotary International
930 Pitner Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60202, U.S.A.
FAX: 847-866-3276 Do not send this form to the RI Lockbox. 337-EN99-Rotaract—(799)
FORM MAY BE PHOTOCOPIEDRotaract Handbook 37
* On 30 June of the Rotaract year in which the member becomes 30 years old his/her Rotaract membership will end.
** As used in this consitution, the term “university” is intended to include all institutions of higher education.
Standard Rotaract Club Constitution
ARTICLE I — Name
The name of this organization shall be the Rotaract Club of
ARTICLE II — Purpose and Goals
The purpose of Rotaract is to provide an opportunity for young men and women to enhance the knowledge and
skills that will assist them in personal development, to address the physical and social needs of their communities,
and to promote better relations between all people worldwide through a framework of friendship and service.
Goals The goals of Rotaract are:
1. To develop professional and leadership skills;
2. To emphasize respect for the rights of others, based on recognition of the worth of each individual;
3. To recognize the dignity and value of all useful occupations as opportunities to serve;
4. To recognize, practice, and promote ethical standards as leadership qualities and vocational responsibilities;
5. To develop knowledge and understanding of the needs, problems and opportunities in the community and
worldwide;
6. To provide opportunities for personal and group activities to serve the community and promote international
understanding and goodwill toward all people.
ARTICLE III — Sponsorship
1. The sponsor of this Rotaract club is the Rotary Club of  which, through a committee of not
less than five Rotarians, shall provide guidance and have supportive responsibility for this Rotaract club. The
continued well-being of this club shall depend on the continued active personal participation of the sponsoring Rotary club.
2. The club shall include on all of its stationary the name of its sponsoring Rotary club.
3. The basis of organization shall be young men and women residing, employed, or studying anywhere in the
vicinity of the sponsoring Rotary club. Where a university or other institution of higher education is located
within the vicinity of the sponsoring Rotary club, the student body of each institution may also be a basis of
organization. This club is not a part of, and neither this club nor its members have any rights or privileges with
respect to, the sponsoring Rotary club.
4. This club is a non-political, non-sectarian organization.
5. In the event that the sponsoring Rotary club is terminated, the governor of the Rotary district will seek to
install another sponsoring Rotary club; if one cannot be found within 120 days, the Rotaract club will be
terminated.
ARTICLE IV — Membership
Rotary Club
Sponsor
Membership
Qualifications
1. The membership of this club shall consist of young men and women of good character and leadership potential between the ages of 18 and 30.* It is recommended, but not mandated, that there be a minimum of 15 charter members when chartering a new club.
2. The method of electing members of this club shall be determined by this club in consultation with the sponsoring Rotary club. The method of electing new members of university-based** Rotaract clubs shall have the
approval of the appropriate authorities.
3. Each member of this Rotaract club shall attend at least 60% of the club’s regularly scheduled meetings annually, provided that absence from a regularly scheduled meeting of the club may be made up as follows; any
member absent from a regular meeting of this club may make up such absence by attendance at a regular meeting of any other Rotaract club or any Rotary club on any day of the two weeks immediately preceding or following the day of the absence. In cases where Rotaractors wish to make up at a Rotary club, the Rotaractor must
gain permission from the club before attending its meeting.
4. All Rotary Foundation scholars, who are within the age guidelines adopted by the board for the Rotaract program, shall be eligible for guest Rotaract club membership during the period of their study in another
country.38 Rotaract Handbook
5. Membership shall automatically terminate (a) upon failure to meet attendance requirements unless excused by
the board of directors of this club for good and sufficient reason or (b) by termination of the club or (c) on 30
June of the Rotaract year in which the member becomes 30 years old.
6. Membership may be terminated (a) upon failure to continue to meet the qualifications for membership, or (b)
for cause, as determined by this club by vote of not less than 2/3 of all the members in good standing.
ARTICLE V — Meetings
1. The club shall meet not less than twice per month, as provided in the by-laws, at a time and place suited to the
convenience of the members.
2. The board of directors shall meet as provided in the by-laws.
3. Rotary International requires each sponsoring Rotary club to designate one or more members of its club to attend the meeting(s) of its Rotaract club(s) at least once a month.
4. Meetings of the club and of the board of directors may be cancelled during holiday or vacation periods at the
discretion of the board of directors, provided that notice is given to the sponsoring Rotary club and the district
Rotaract representative.
5. Minutes of the meetings of the club and board of directors shall be provided to the chairman of the sponsor
Rotary club’s Rotaract committee within two weeks after each meeting is held.
ARTICLE VI — Officers and Directors
Bimonthly
Meetings
1. The officers of this club shall be a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer and such additional officer(s)
as may be provided in the by-laws.
2. The governing body of this club shall be a board of directors composed of the president, immediate past president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, and additional directors whose number shall be determined by this
club, all to be elected from among the members in good standing. All decisions, policies, and actions of the board
and of the club shall be subject to the provisions of this constitution and policy established by Rotary International and its members.
If university-based, this club shall be subject to the same regulations and policies established by the appropriate
authorities for all student organizations and extracurricular activities of the university.
The board of directors shall have general control over all officers and committees and may, for good cause, declare any office vacant. It shall constitute a board of appeals from the rulings of all officers and actions of all
committees.
3. Elections of officers and directors shall be held annually prior to 1 March by methods compatible with local
customs and procedures, but in no case shall more than simple majority of the members present and in good
standing be required for elections. All Rotaract club presidents and district representatives who reach the age
of 30 during the term of office may serve one additional year as immediate past president or immediate past
district representative, to provide continuity in leadership.
The term of office of all officers and directors shall be one year. No provisions shall be made for a term of office shorter than one year except with the written permission of Rotary International.
4. All incoming Rotaract club officers, directors, and committee chairmen shall be provided with leadership training from the district Rotaract committee* in conjunction with the RI district Rotaract committee.**
ARTICLE VII — Activities and Projects
Governing
Body
1. Within the limits prescribed in Section 1 of Article III, this club shall be responsible for planning, organizing,
financing, and conducting its own activities and shall itself supply money, manpower, and creative imagination necessary thereto, except in the case of joint projects or activities undertaken in cooperation with other organizations, such responsibility shall be shared with such other organization(s).
2. This club shall undertake among its activities at least two major service projects annually, one to serve the community and the other to promote international understanding, and each shall involve all or most of the members of the club.
3. This club shall provide for a professional development program for its members.
4. It is the responsibility of the club to raise the funds necessary to carry out its program. It shall not solicit or accept more than occasional or incidental financial assistance from the sponsoring Rotary club, nor shall it make
general solicitation from Rotary clubs other than its sponsoring Rotary club or from other Rotaract clubs; nor
shall it solicit financial assistance from individuals, businesses, or organizations in the community without giving something of value in return. All funds raised for service projects must be expended for that purpose.
Objective
* District Rotaract committee (composed of Rotaractors) ** RI district Rotaract committee (composed of Rotarians)Rotaract Handbook 39
ARTICLE VIII — Committees
1. There shall be provided in the by-laws of this club the following standing committees; club service, international
service, community service, professional development, finance, and such other standing committees as may be
deemed necessary or convenient for the administration of the club.
2. The president, with the approval of the board, may appoint such special committees as he may deem necessary,
citing their duties at the time of appointment. All such special committees shall lapse upon the completion of their
duties, upon discharge by the appointing president, or with the end of his term of office, whichever occurs first.
ARTICLE IX — Fees
5 Committees
Fees
Constitution Every member of the club, by acceptance of membership, thereby accepts the principles of Rotaract as expressed in
its purpose and goals and agrees to comply with the constitution and by-laws of this club, and on these conditions
alone is entitled to the privileges of the club. No member shall be absolved from the observance of the constitution
and by-laws on the plea that a copy of them has not been received.
ARTICLE XI — Standard By-Laws
The club shall adopt the “Standard Rotaract Club By-Laws,” together with such amendments as are not inconsistent with this constitution and which may be deemed necessary or convenient for the government of the club, provided that such amendments are adopted in accordance with the amendment procedure prescribed in the
“Standard Rotaract Club By-Laws.”
ARTICLE XII — Rotaract Emblem
Standard
By-Laws
1. The Rotaract emblem shall be preserved for the exclusive use and benefit of Rotaract club members. Each member of this club shall be entitled to wear or otherwise display the Rotaract emblem in a dignified and appropriate manner during the period of membership. Such entitlement shall be relinquished upon termination of
membership or termination of this club.
2. When displayed by individual club members, the emblem may be used without further information. When the
emblem is used to represent a club, the name of the club should appear with the emblem.
ARTICLE XIII — Duration
Rotaract
Emblem
Duration
of Club
This club shall exist so long as it continues to function in accordance with the provisions of this constitution and policy
relating to Rotaract established by Rotary International, or until it is terminated (a) by this club upon it own determination and action, (b) by the sponsoring Rotary club upon withdrawal of its sponsorship, after consultation with
the district governor and district Rotaract representative, or (c) by Rotary International for failure to function in
accordance with this constitution or for other cause.
Upon termination of this club, all rights and privileges relating to the Rotaract name and emblem shall be relinquished by the club and by its members individually and collectively.
ARTICLE XIV — Administration
1. Each sponsoring Rotary club upon organization of a new Rotaract club shall be required to pay an RI Rotaract
organization fee equivalent to US$50 with the “Rotaract Club Organization List.”
2. Any fees, dues, or assessments on the membership of the club shall be nominal and shall only be for the purpose of meeting the administrative costs of the club. Funds for activities and projects undertaken by the club
shall be raised apart from such fees, dues, or assessments. A thorough audit by a qualified person shall be made
once each year of all the club’s financial transactions.
ARTICLE X — Acceptance of Constitution and By-Laws
Amendment The constitution may be amended only by the Board of Directors of Rotary International and all amendments to the
“Standard Rotaract Club Constitution” adopted by the Board of Directors of Rotary International shall automatically
amend the Constitution.40 Rotaract Handbook
STANDARD ROTARACT CLUB BY-LAWS
By-Laws of the Rotaract Club of  .
ARTICLE I — Elections
1. Election for the offices of president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, and directors shall be held annually
prior to 1 March. A Rotaract club year is the same as a Rotary club year. Those elected shall take office on 1 July.
2. Nominations of officers shall be made in writing. Candidates shall be voted upon at the regular meeting following the meeting at which nominations are made. Voting shall be by secret ballot. Those candidates receiving a
majority of the votes of the members present and in good standing shall be elected.
3. In addition to president, vice-president, secretary, and treasurer there shall be elected  directors.
ARTICLE II — Duties of Officers
Voting Method
Official Duties 1. President. The president shall preside at all regular and special meetings of the club and the board of directors.
He shall, with the approval of the board, appoint all standing and special committees and, in the event of a
vacancy in the board of directors, shall, with the approval of the board, fill such vacancy by appointment until
the next regular election of the club. He shall be an ex officio member of all committees. He shall maintain communication with the sponsor club and the district Rotaract representative to ensure they are continually informed of all actions taken by the club.
2. Vice-President. The vice-president shall succeed to the office of president in the event or removal of the latter
for whatever cause, and, in the absence of the president, shall preside at all meetings of the club and of the
board.
3. Secretary. The secretary shall maintain all club records, He shall keep minutes of all the meetings of the club and
board of directors, and provide copies of such to the chairman of the sponsor Rotary club’s Rotaract
committee.
4. Treasurer. The treasurer shall have custody of all club funds, maintaining all necessary records and depositing
all such funds in a bank approved by the board of directors. He shall report on the club’s financial status at each
meeting of the club and shall hold all records available for inspection by any club member. All disbursements
shall be by check and with the signature of two authorized officers.
ARTICLE III — Meetings
Quorum
Requirement
1. Meetings of the club shall be not less than twice a month, and meetings of the board not less than once a month,
at a time and place suited to the convenience of the membership.
2. A majority of the members in good standing shall constitute a quorum at any regular or special meeting of the
club. Any four members of the board, one of whom must be the president or vice-president, shall constitute a
quorum at any meeting of the board.
ARTICLE IV — Fees and Dues
Fees and
Dues
1. The admission for the new members shall be  . Annual dues shall be  per member.
2. All fees and dues must be paid before a member will be considered in good standing.
ARTICLE V — Committees
Committee
Duties
The president, with the approval of the board of directors, shall appoint the following standing committees:
1. Club service. This committee shall be responsible for attendance, membership, programs, fellowship, public
relations, and such other matters as may be deemed appropriate.
2. International service. This committee shall be charged with primary responsibility for enhancing knowledge
and understanding of worldwide needs, problems, and opportunities and developing activities to give service
for promoting international understanding and goodwill toward all people.
3. Community service. This committee shall have responsibility for enhancing knowledge and understanding of
community needs, problems and opportunities, and for formulating and developing appropriate activities for
serving the community (including the university community).
4. Professional development. This committee shall be responsible for developing a program designed to provide
information about a wide cross-section of businesses and professions and to stimulate awareness and acceptance of high ethical standards in business and professional life.
5. Finance. This committee shall devise ways and means of financing any and all club activities requiring funds,
in cooperation with the appropriate committee.
The international service and community service committees shall each have the duty of initiating and planning
one major activity in its field each year which shall involve all or most of the club membership.
ARTICLE VI — Amendments
Amendments 1. These by-laws may be amended by majority vote of the members in good standing at any regular or special
meeting of the club at which a quorum is present, provided notice of intention to call such a vote is given at least
fourteen days earlier at a meeting of the club at which a quorum is present, and provided such amendment is
approved by the sponsoring Rotary club.
2. Nothing in these by-laws shall contravene any provision of this club’s constitution.
661-EN—(1000)Rotaract Handbook 41
* On 30 June of the Rotaract year in which the member becomes 30 years old, his/her Rotaract membership will end.
** As used in this statement of policy, the term “university” is intended to include all institutions of higher education.
Rotaract Statement of Policy
 1. The Rotaract program was created by and is an activity of Rotary International, who holds authority for the establishment of constitutional provisions, organizational requirements, and standards of procedure, as well as the protection of the Rotaract name and
emblem.
 2. A Rotaract club is a Rotary club-sponsored organization of young men and women between the ages of 18 and 30* whose purpose
is to provide an opportunity for young men and women to enhance the knowledge and skills that will assist them in personal
development, to address the physical and social needs of their communities, and to promote better relations between all people
worldwide through a framework of friendship and service, and whose goals are:
a) To develop professional and leadership skills;
b) To emphasize respect for the rights of others, based on recognition of the worth of each individual;
c) To recognize the dignity and value of all useful occupations as opportunities to serve;
d) To recognize, practice, and promote ethical standards as leadership qualities and vocational responsibilities;
e) To develop knowledge and understanding of the needs, problems, and opportunities in the community and worldwide;
f) To provide opportunities for personal and group activities to serve the community and promote international understanding
and goodwill toward all people.
 3. Rotaract club programming shall consist of professional development, leadership development, and service program development
as outlined in the “Standard Rotaract Club Constitution.”
 4. A Rotaract club is organized, sponsored, and counseled by a Rotary club or clubs and is established following the endorsement
of the district governor upon certification by Rotary International; its existence depends upon the continued sponsorship of its
sponsoring Rotary club and continued recognition by Rotary International.
 5.   It is recommended, but not mandated, that a new Rotaract club have a minimum of 15 charter members.
 6. Within the framework established by Rotary International, the sponsoring Rotary club is responsible for organizing the Rotaract
club and providing it with guidance thereafter.
 7. Rotary clubs which sponsor Rotaract clubs are encouraged to invite Rotaractors on at least a quarterly basis to their regularly
scheduled meetings, project planning meetings, and special events, and are encouraged to review Rotary club membership potential within their Rotaract clubs on a periodic basis.
 8. Rotaract clubs are encouraged to invite their sponsoring Rotary club to Rotaract club meetings, project planning meetings, and
special events on at least a quarterly basis.
 9. Rotaract clubs are encouraged to develop lists of their club members who might hold a Rotary classification as well as maintain
lists of current and past club members indicating their interest in Rotary service projects, both lists to be shared with their sponsoring Rotary club(s).
10. Where the Rotaract club is university-based, control and counsel by the sponsoring Rotary club shall be exercised in full cooperation with the university authorities, with the understanding that such a club is subject to the same regulations and policies established by the authorities for all student organizations and extracurricular activities of the university.**
11. All Rotaract club activities, projects and programs shall be conducted in harmony with the policies of Rotary International.
12. There shall be a standard Rotaract club constitution prescribed by Rotary International and subject to amendment only by the
board of directors of Rotary International. As a prerequisite of its organization and certification, each Rotaract club shall adopt the
“Standard Rotaract Club Constitution” and all amendments.
13. Each Rotaract club shall adopt bylaws not inconsistent with the “Standard Rotaract Club Constitution” and with policy established
by Rotary International. Such bylaws shall be subject to the approval of the sponsoring Rotary club.
14. A Rotaract club may be organized and sponsored jointly by more than one Rotary club under the following conditions:
a) The district governor must give his approval, stating in writing that, in his considered judgment, the best interests of the district, the Rotary clubs concerned and the Rotaract program would be served by the proposed joint sponsorship.42 Rotaract Handbook
b) The circumstances must be such that the organization of separate Rotaract clubs, each sponsored by a single Rotary club, would
create an artificial division of what is essentially a single body of young adults within the community or university.
c) A joint Rotaract committee must be created with effective representation from each of the sponsoring Rotary clubs.
15. Each member of a Rotaract club agrees to accept and to adhere to the provisions of the constitution and bylaws of his or her club.
16. Membership in a Rotaract club shall be evidenced by Rotaract club membership identification cards supplied to Rotaract clubs by
Rotary International.
17. The Rotaract name and emblem are the property of Rotary International and shall be preserved for the exclusive use of those involved in the Rotaract program. When displayed by individual club members, the emblems may be used without further information. When the emblem is used to represent a club, the name of the club should appear with the emblem. Where a Rotary district
exists, it may use the respective emblem but only in conjunction with reference to the district and its number.
18. A Rotaract club member shall be entitled to use and display the Rotaract name and emblem in an appropriate and dignified manner during the period of his or her membership in a Rotaract club. He or she shall relinquish such entitlement upon termination
of his or her membership in his or her Rotaract club or upon the termination of his or her Rotaract club.
19. A Rotaract club may be terminated:
a) By Rotary International, with or without the consent, approval or concurrence of the sponsoring Rotary club, for failure to function in accordance with its constitution, or for other cause.
b) By its sponsoring Rotary club, after consultation with the district governor and the district Rotaract representative, or
c) By the Rotaract club itself upon its own determination.
20. Upon termination of a Rotaract club, all rights and privileges relating to the name and emblem shall be relinquished by the club
and by its members individually and collectively.
21. As a matter of policy, the board does not recognize the right of any individual or organization except RI to circularize Rotaract
clubs for any commercial purpose, except in the case of Rotaractors who are responsible for organizing Rotaract club, district and
multidistrict meetings.
22. District governors are requested to appoint district Rotaract committees, composed of Rotarians from various parts of the district,
to assist the district governor in publicizing the Rotaract program, promoting the organization of new Rotaract clubs, and administering the program of Rotaract within the district. Where feasible and practicable in the appointment of district Rotaract committees, there should be provision for continuity of membership by appointing one or more members for a second term.
23. Rotaract organization and meetings beyond the club level:
a) A district with two or more Rotaract clubs must elect a district Rotaract representative from among their membership. The
method of election shall be determined by the Rotaract membership. As a qualification for election to Rotaract representative,
a person must have served as a Rotaract club president or as a member of the Rotaract district committee for one year.
b) In a district with one Rotaract club, the district Rotaract representative shall be the most recent, available past Rotaract club
president.
c) The district Rotaract representative will be guided and counseled by the Rotary district governor, the Rotary district Rotaract
committee, or other appropriate Rotary district committee.
d) Each district is encouraged to develop a district Rotaract organization, headed by the district Rotaract representative, to carry
out the following responsibilities:
  1) Develop and distribute a district Rotaract newsletter;
  2) Plan, arrange, and hold a district Rotaract conference;
  3) Encourage attendance and participation at the Rotary district conference;
  4) Conduct Rotaract promotion and extension activities throughout the district in coordination with the district Rotaract
chairperson;
  5) Serve as Rotaract information liaison to the RI Secretariat for the district;
  6) Plan and implement service activities (if approved by three-fourths of the Rotaract clubs in the district);
  7) Provide advice and support to Rotaract clubs in implementing their projects;
  8) Work with the district Rotaract chairperson to help coordinate Rotary/Rotaract activities in the district;Rotaract Handbook 43
  9) Coordinate public relations activities for Rotaract at the district level;
10) Work with the district Rotaract chairperson to plan and implement a training session for Rotaract club officers in the district.
e) The purpose of the district-wide meeting of Rotaract clubs is to promote community service projects, increase international
understanding and enhance professional development in a context of friendship and camaraderie.
f) No meeting of members of Rotaract clubs beyond the club level shall have any legislative authority nor shall be so organized
as to give the appearance of having such authority. Nevertheless, such a meeting may include ideas which might be of value
as advisory observations to those involved at the district or other levels of Rotaract administration.
g) At a district Rotaract meeting, a three-fourths majority of the Rotaract clubs in a district may vote to undertake a district service project and to establish a district Rotaract service fund to raise funds for this project. Contributions to such a fund must
be voluntary. Such a project and service fund must be approved by the district governor, and specific plans and instructions
for the administration of the district project and use of the fund must also have the approval of the district governor and threefourths of the Rotaract clubs in the district. The district governor must appoint a district fund committee to be responsible for
collecting and administering the district fund, such committee to be composed of Rotaractors from the district and at least one
Rotarian from the district Rotaract committee. The district service fund must be kept in a bank account which clearly indicates
that the fund is the property of the district Rotaract organization and not the personal property of any individual Rotaractor
or Rotaract club.
h) All district Rotaract activities shall be financed by the Rotaract clubs in the district. No expenses of district Rotaract club meetings shall be paid by Rotary International. The cost of such meetings shall be minimal and within the financial means of those
participating.
24. Rotaract activities beyond the district level
a) Rotaract Multidistrict Service Projects. Rotaract-sponsored service projects involving clubs in two or more districts may be
implemented provided that such projects
  1) are, in nature and scope, within the capability of the clubs and Rotaractors in the districts to undertake successfully without interfering with or detracting from the scope and effectiveness of club activities in furthering the program of Rotaract
at the club level;
  2) shall not be undertaken initially unless each district Rotaract representative concerned has agreed to such a joint project
and then, only after approval of two-thirds of the clubs in each district;
  3) shall be undertaken with the approval of the district governors concerned;
  4) shall be under the direct supervision of the district Rotaract representatives concerned; the custody of all funds contributed or collected for such projects shall be the responsibility of the district representatives concerned, through a committee of Rotaractors from within the districts involved, who may be appointed to assist in administering any such project
and related funds;
  5) shall be undertaken only after the district Rotaract representatives have jointly secured in advance the authorization of the
general secretary, acting on behalf of the board, to undertake the project;
  6) shall involve the participation by Rotaract clubs and/or individual Rotaractors on a voluntary basis, clearly presented as
such; the cost of participation by a club or individual Rotaractor, if any, should be kept to a minimum, and not be implicitly or directly made an obligation in the form of a per capita tax, or assessment or otherwise;
b) Rotaract Multidistrict Information Organizations. Districts may develop a multidistrict organization for the purpose of disseminating information and facilitating communication between Rotaract clubs in the districts concerned, provided that
  1) there is no objection by the district governors of each of the districts concerned;
  2) approval is secured from the RI Board of Directors to develop such an organization;
  3) Rotaract representatives of the districts concerned comprise the membership of such organizations. Each district Rotaract
representative may appoint a member for his or her district organization, as needed, to carry out the activities of the
multidistrict organization;
  4) funds needed to implement the organization’s activities (e.g., production and distribution of regional club directories and
newsletters, dissemination of Rotaract program information, general correspondence) shall be obtained on a voluntary
basis only;
  5) the organization has no decision making or legislative powers, except for decisions concerning the activities of the organization, for which each member (district Rotaract representative) shall have one vote.
c) Rotaract Multidistrict Meetings
  1) Rotaract worldwide meetings shall require the approval of the host district governor(s) and RI director for the region, and
shall also require approval of the RI Board of Directors. Proposals for such meetings shall be submitted by the host district Rotaract representative and the proposal shall describe date, location, facilities, participants, program, budget and
include proof of adequate liability insurance;44 Rotaract Handbook
660-EN—(799)
  2) Rotaract multidistrict meetings (not at a worldwide level) shall require that the host district Rotaract representative provide a copy of the meeting proposal which describes date, location, facilities, participants, program budget and includes
proof of adequate liability insurance to the district governors concerned, and the approval of the host district governor.
The district Rotaract representative shall inform the RI director(s) for the region(s) and the general secretary of the event;
  3) Rotaract exchange teams are encouraged when undertaken in accordance with the guidelines established by the RI board;
  4) as part of the official program of the annual RI convention, a special Rotaract forum two days prior to the commencement
of the convention shall be arranged and implemented by RI, to include discussion of issues identified by the RI Rotaract
committee as important to Rotaractors;
  5) the Rotaract pre-convention forum may be used as an opportunity to informally gauge Rotaract opinion on policy or program matters, with each district represented having one vote. Any recommendations made at the pre-convention meeting shall be forwarded to the RI Rotaract committee for its review and consideration.
25. Leadership Training
a) All incoming Rotaract club officers shall be provided with Rotaract club officers leadership training at the district level, such
training to include a one- to two-day leadership training seminar conducted by the district Rotaract committee in coordination with the RI district Rotaract committee for all incoming Rotaract club officers, directors, and committee chairpersons to
be paid for by the sponsoring Rotary clubs, or where circumstances dictate, by a mutually agreed-upon financial arrangement
involving the sponsoring Rotary clubs, Rotary district, and the Rotaract participants.
b) Rotary districts shall provide leadership training of district Rotaract committees on a multidistrict basis.
26. Financing the cost of the Rotaract program:
a) Individual Rotaractors shall pay annual membership fees to their Rotaract club to cover the cost of club administration;
b) Rotaract clubs shall pay annual fees or dues to their district Rotaract organization to cover the cost of district administration;
c) Sponsoring Rotary clubs shall pay for the attendance of their Rotaract club officers, directors, and committee chairpersons at
district level leadership training meetings (or, when circumstances dictate, these meetings shall be paid for through mutually
agreed upon financial arrangements involving the sponsoring Rotary clubs, the Rotary district, and the Rotaract participants);
d) Rotary districts shall pay for the attendance of their districts’ Rotaract representatives at multidistrict leadership training meetings;
e) Rotaract program financial policy includes the following:
  1) Rotary International shall provide for Rotaract activities at the international convention and shall provide program materials to district Rotaract chairpersons, representatives, and Rotaract clubs.
  2) No part of the expenses of meetings of Rotaract clubs or groups of Rotaract clubs shall be paid by Rotary International,
with the exception of the annual Rotaract Pre-Convention Meeting.
  3) Any dues or assessments on the membership of any Rotaract club should be nominal and should be only for the purpose
of covering the cost of administering the club; funds for activities and projects undertaken by Rotaract clubs should be
raised by such clubs apart from such dues or assessments.
  4) It is the responsibility of the Rotaract club to raise the funds necessary to carry out the program of the club.
  5) Rotary clubs and Rotary district conferences inviting members or Rotaract clubs to participate in the programs of such
clubs and conferences should subscribe to sufficient trip, accident and liability insurance to protect the Rotary club or district conference against any possible legal or moral obligation and liability.
  6) Rotaract clubs should not make general solicitations for financial assistance from Rotary clubs or from other Rotaract
clubs.
  7) Contributions to fund district Rotaract service projects must be voluntary and cannot be made enforceable upon the individual Rotaractor or Rotaract club.
27. As a matter of principle, Rotaract clubs are not authorized to assume membership or merge with other organizations regardless
of the purpose of such organizations.Rotaract Handbook 45
Summary of Rotaract Plans and Objectives
Rotaract Club of   District
Sponsoring Rotary club
For use by incoming Rotaract club president. Send copies of completed form to sponsoring Rotary club and
District Rotaract Representative.
Major Objectives 1.
2.
3.
Plans for Annual Community Service Project — (RI-emphasized Community Service areas: AIDS, Urban Peace,
Functional Literacy and Numeracy Promotion, Concern for the Aging, Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention,
Preserve Planet Earth, PolioPlus vaccinations, Assistance to the Disabled, Children at Risk and Hunger Alleviation).
Purpose Expense
Goals 1.
2.
3.
Sources of Funding
Agencies Assisting in
Project Development
Plan of Action 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Plans for Annual International Service Project — (RI program resources and Rotary Foundation grants provide
assistance for International Service projects: World Community Service Projects Exchange, Rotary Volunteers
International Volunteer and Site Lists, Grants for Rotary Volunteers, Matching Grants, and 3-H Grants).
Purpose Expense
Goals 1.
2.
3.
Sources of Funding
Agencies Assisting in
Project Development46 Rotaract Handbook
Plan of Action 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Club Service Plans (list possible activities)
Membership Recruitment (areas to target such as universities, health clubs, churches)
1.
2.
Fundraising (possible corporate sponsors, project ideas)
1.
2.
Club Promotion (available media resources, materials to be developed)
1.
2.
Meeting Programs (possible speakers, field trips)
1.
2.
Professional Development Series (Rotarians to provide talks, agencies to provide seminars, and other resources)
1.
2.
Member Leadership Training (training in RI and Rotary Foundation programs, project
development, club development for officers)
1.
2.
Major Social Activities (RI provides information on international Rotaract meetings)
1.
2.Rotaract Handbook 47
Rotaract Club Organization List
Rotaract Club of  District
Mailing address of Rotaract club
Phone number  Fax number
E-mail
Sponsoring Rotary club(s)
This list constitutes official notification to Rotary International of the organization of a Rotaract club.
1. Print or type the name of each charter member, including age, gender, and mailing address;
2. Obtain required signatures on the back page;
3. Keep a copy for your files, and send the original organization list to your District Governor and a copy to
your District Rotaract Representative.
4. Ask the District Governor to sign the form, and send the original to the RI Service Center serving your
area and a copy to your club. The District Governor should also send copies of the signed “Rotaract Club
Organization List” to the District Rotaract Committee Chairperson and the District Rotaract Representative.
5. Please submit payment for the “RI Rotaract Club Organization Fee” to the RI Service Center or fiscal agent
nearest you, in check or money order equivalent to US$50 and payable to “Rotary International”.
Name Age Gender Address
(Pres.)
(V.P.)
(Sec’y.)
(Treas.)
(Dir.)
(Dir.)
The RI Board recommends, but does not mandate, a minimum of 15 charter members.
All must be between the ages of 18 and 30.48 Rotaract Handbook
Name Age Sex Address
What language do you prefer for receiving correspondence?
❑ English ❑ French ❑ Japanese ❑ Korean ❑ Portugese ❑ Spanish
Is “Rotaract Club Organization Fee” for US$50 (or fiscal agent receipt) attached? ❑ Yes ❑ No
The members listed above are all young adults of good character and leadership potential, between the ages of 18
and 30, who live, work, or study in the vicinity of the sponsoring Rotary club. This club understands and accepts
the provisions of the “Standard Rotaract Club Constitution” and the “Rotaract Statement of Policy”.
Signatures:
FOR RI SECRETARIAT USE ONLY
Service Center
MS 1. Payment for US$  received? ❑ Yes ❑ No
2. List complete and correct? ❑ Yes ❑ No
3. If not, please return to sender.
4. If yes, please send to CP210. Comments: 
World Headquarters
FD Receipt for US$  received? ❑ Yes ❑ No Comments: 
MS List complete and correct? ❑ Yes ❑ No Follow-up sent: 
MS Certificate mailed:  Please send to CP210.
CP210 (ID#  Sponsor ID#  )
President, Rotaract club
President, sponsoring Rotary club
Date of organization of Rotaract club
District Governor
672-EN—(397)Rotaract Handbook 49
Rotaract Membership Application
Name:
Family Name First Middle
Date of birth:
Home Address:
Office Address:
Telephone/
Fax Numbers:
E-mail Address:
Occupational
Classification/
Area of Study:
Areas of interest: ❑ Community Service
❑ International Service
❑ Professional Development
❑ Youth Service
❑ Club Service
1. Will you take part in 60% of the club’s social and service activities? ❑ Yes ❑ No
2. Are you willing to pay member dues? ❑ Yes ❑ No
3. The Rotary Foundation offers opportunities to Rotaractors (who are not children or
grandchildren of Rotarians) for study and travel abroad. Please indicate if you are a child
or grandchild of a Rotarian.
❑ Yes, I am. ❑ No, I am not.
I understand and accept the principles of Rotaract as expressed in its purpose and objectives, and agree to comply with and be bound by the “Standard Rotaract Club
Constitution”, “Rotaract Statement of Policy”, and by-laws of the club.
Signature:
Date:
Rotaract club secretary should retain this form for club records.50 Rotaract Handbook
Notice of Rotaract Alumnus (Potential Rotarian)
To the Secretary of
the Rotary Club of:
(club name)
PLEASE BE INFORMED THAT THE ROTARACT ALUMNUS LISTED BELOW MAY BE ELIGIBLE
FOR ROTARY CLUB MEMBERSHIP.
Rotaract Alumnus:
(name of individual)
Address:
Is associated with:
(firm, company or institution)
Rotaract Membership Data
Admission date:
Past club offices: 1.
2.
3.
4.
Rotaract Club of:
Signature of
Rotaract Club
Secretary:
Note: If the above individual’s classification is filled in your club, he or she may be eligible for
additional active membership under Article III, Section 3 of the “By-laws of Rotary International.”
However, there is no obligation to your club to consider the above-named person for membership.
No acknowledgment of this notification is necessary.Rotaract Handbook 51
Rotaract Member Guide
As a member of the local Rotaract club, sponsored by the leading professionals and businessmen in your
community, you are also part of an international organization with more than 6,400 clubs around the
world. Rotaract offers exciting ways to learn how to organize community service projects, develop fundraising skills, learn methods for club promotion, and lead others in developing their ideals and skills.
With members in over 170 countries and geographical areas, Rotaract also provides a window to the world.
Here are a few ways to make the most of your membership.
What would you like to
accomplish?
● Serve your community
● Provide good leadership
● Build friendships
● Improve public relations
● Advance professionally
● Become a fund developer
● Develop international contacts
How can Rotaract help?
● Rotaract Community Service Projects
● Rotaract committee work,
Rotaract District Assemblies,
Rotary Youth Leadership Award
Seminars
● Rotaract fellowship activities
● Rotaract club and project promotion
● Rotaract Professional
Development Series
● Fundraising for Rotaract Service Projects
● Rotaract Exchange Teams
● Home Hospitality,
Rotaract Pre-Convention Meeting
What can you do?
● Volunteer for the Community
Service Committee
● Chair a committee or serve as club
officer
● Plan the next social activity
or membership drive
● Volunteer to contact media for club and
project promotion
● Help match Rotaract interests
with Rotarian expertise
● Organize a club fundraising project
● Help set up an exchange team, host
Rotaractors from another country, or
participate in an international meeting
The Rotaract Handbook is a comprehensive
resource that describes these opportunities
for Rotaract clubs and their members. Once
you are familiar with the Rotaract program,
you can begin to chart your course with the
help of Rotaract club officers and the
sponsoring Rotarians.
For copies of the Rotaract Handbook contact:
Community Programs Section, Rotary
International, One Rotary Center, 1560
Sherman Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201 USA,
Fax: 847-866-6116
The best way to get started in Rotaract is to:
1. Become active in club meetings and
social activities;
2. Find out how you can attend a Rotary
club meeting;
3. Participate in regional Rotaract meetings
and conferences;
4. Volunteer for service projects;
5. Help plan meeting programs;
6. Visit other Rotaract clubs when you
travel;
7. Attend the annual Rotaract PreConvention Meeting.
The better you know your fellow
Rotaractors and Rotarian sponsors, the
easier it will be to get involved in Rotaract
activities. Let your club and district know
that you want to be active in Rotaract.
Start at the club level by assisting with club
projects and activities. Think of ideas that
you are willing to turn into reality. Then52 Rotaract Handbook
you may be ready to chair a club committee
(community service, international service,
professional development, club service, or
finance). After showing you can effectively
manage a committee and inspire success
among committee members, your Rotaract
colleagues may elect you to serve as a club
officer (secretary, treasurer, vice-president,
president, or a member of the board of
directors). As a committee chairperson or
officer, you will have an opportunity to attend
the Rotaract District Assembly and learn
more about Rotaract at the district level.
Next, make yourself known at the district
level as a Rotaractor who is responsible for
well-organized projects that promote the
Rotary ideal of Service Above Self. Share your
successes with the District Rotaract Representative, and the District Governor, and let
them know that they can rely on you to
carry out successful projects and provide
club direction.
Your Rotaract district has the same geographic borders as the Rotary district.
It may have only one Rotaract club or
perhaps 100. Whatever its size, the district
is the means for spreading Rotaract to new
communities. The district level is also the
springboard to international Rotaract
opportunities. Get to know Rotaractors
from the region and other countries. Correspond with Rotaractors internationally
through the Worldwide Rotaract Directory.
Your success in extending Rotaract in the
district may lead to your election as
District Rotaract Representative, giving
you an opportunity to help others with
their project organization and leadership
training. As District Rotaract Representative,
you also are responsible for planning the
Rotaract District Assembly and Rotaract
District Conference.
There are also multidistrict Rotaract
opportunities — for example, planning a
special national Rotaract conference or
developing a conference proposal for your
district to host the triennial international
Rotaract conference, INTEROTA.
Rotaractors with leadership experience
and valuable ideas may be asked to serve
as advisors to Rotaract or youth committees
of Rotary International. There are endless
opportunities, all you have to do is get
started!Rotaract Handbook 53
Rotaract Annual Project Report
COMMUNITY SERVICE
Rotaract Club: District:
Sponsoring
Rotary Club:
Country:
Project Name:
Date project began:                                                 Date project was completed:
Project Location:
Cost of project:
How many
individuals
were benefited?
Describe project detailing Rotaract-Rotary involvement, types of publicity received, funds raised,
equipment purchased, program(s) developed specifically for the project, and assistance from outside
organizations. Please attach a separate sheet of paper if necessary.
If possible, please include at least one photo, showing the project in action, to be considered for
publication in THE ROTARIAN, Rotaract News, and Rotary World. Also include newspaper clippings
whenever possible.
Mail all reports by 1 MAY to:
Community Programs Section
Rotary International
One Rotary Center
1560 Sherman Avenue
Evanston, IL 60201 USA
Or Fax:  847-866-611654 Rotaract Handbook
Rotaract Annual Project Report
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
Rotaract Club: District:
Sponsoring
Rotary Club:
Country:
Project Name:
Date project began:                                                 Date project was completed:
Project Location:
Cost of project:
How many
individuals
were benefited?
Describe project detailing Rotaract-Rotary involvement, types of publicity received, funds raised,
equipment purchased, program(s) developed specifically for the project, and assistance from outside
organizations. Please attach a separate sheet of paper if necessary.
If possible, please include at least one photo, showing the project in action, to be considered for
publication in THE ROTARIAN, Rotaract News and Rotary World. Also include newspaper clippings
whenever possible.
Mail all reports by 1 MAY to:
Community Programs Section
Rotary International
One Rotary Center
1560 Sherman Avenue
Evanston, IL 60201 USA
Or Fax:  847-866-6116Rotaract Handbook 55
The Rotary International Calendar
JULY
Literacy Month
1 July, Beginning of Rotary year
AUGUST
Membership Extension Month
SEPTEMBER
New Generations Month
15 September, Deadline for submitting
information and original photos to RI
for issue two of Rotaract News
OCTOBER
Vocational Service Month
NOVEMBER
The Rotary Foundation Month
DECEMBER
No Designation
JANUARY
Rotary Awareness Month
FEBRUARY
World Understanding Month
23 February, Rotary’s Anniversary
MARCH
1 March, Submit RI Recognition of
Outstanding Projects form to RI
Week of 13 March,
World Rotaract Week
15 March, Deadline for submitting
information and original photos to RI
for issue one of Rotaract News
APRIL
Magazine Month
1 April, Submit Rotaract Data form
and DRR appointments to RI
15 April, Submit World Rotaract
Week Recognition form to RI
MAY
No Designation
JUNE
Rotaract Pre-Convention Meeting
RI Convention
30 June, End of Rotary year

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